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  • Alexander Rose speaking in Portland September 17th

    Blog of the Long Now
    Andrew Warner
    31 Aug 2015 | 11:42 am
    On Thursday, September 17th, Alexander Rose (Executive Director of Long Now) will give a talk on how to design for 10,000 years, including how he approached many of the unique design challenges of The Clock. Thursday, September 17th 5:30 – 7:30 pm Lincoln Recital Hall (PSU) 1620 SW Park Avenue General Admission: $10 Tickets available here!  
  • New Book: Our Accelerating Future: How Superintelligence, Nanotechnology, and Transhumanism Will Transform the Planet

    Accelerating Future
    Michael Anissimov
    16 Aug 2015 | 6:49 am
    Buy it here: Look insideDetailsPreview Buy ($3.99) Our Accelerating Future Michael Anissimov Did you like the movies The Matrix or Ex Machina? If so, you will enjoy this book. It investigates the philosophy of superintelligent artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, transhumanism, cybernetics, and how they will transform our world. Zenit Books August 16, 2015 272 pages After much work, my brand new book Our Accelerating Future: How Superintelligence, Nanotechnology, and Transhumanism Will Transform the Planet is now released! Get it below as an epub/mobi/pdf package for $3.99. Click…
  • How mass extinctions can accelerate robot evolution

    KurzweilAI » News
    31 Aug 2015 | 8:48 pm
    At the start of the simulation, a biped robot controlled by a computationally evolved brain stands upright on a 16 meter by 16 meter surface. The simulation proceeds until the robot falls or until 15 seconds have elapsed. (credit: Joel Lehman) Robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters, such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs, computer scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have found. Mass extinctions speed up evolution by unleashing new creativity in adaptations. Computer scientists Risto Miikkulainen and…
  • Proposed Armored Nuclear Powered Cruiser Design with a Dozen Railguns

    Next Big Future
    31 Aug 2015 | 11:58 pm
    The Center for International Marine Security considers a battleship style ship design with armor and a dozen railguns.The CARN (cruiser gun armor, nuclear powered) will need to adapt the principles of the ‘armored citadel’ concepts developed a century ago for battleships to the needs of securing the two, possibly three, nuclear reactors aboard and their associated pumps and other equipment. It would be a new over 25,000 ton armored cruiser.Depending on the amount of power twelve railguns firing broadsides will require, two or three of the standardized nuclear plants.The primary use of the…
  • Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

    the Foresight Institute
    Jim Lewis
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:51 pm
    Three-dimensional rendering of surface features imaged by ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging. (Source: University of Colorado). The surface shown is a portion of Fig. 4a. Judging from the scale bar in the scanning electron micrograph of this surface shown in Fig. 1b, the inner diameter of the circle is about 10 µm (10,000 nm). As we noted back in April, Richard Feynman in his classic 1959 talk challenged his fellow physicists to make the electron microscope 100 times better. A “new super powerful electron microscope that can pinpoint the position of single atoms” had…
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    Blog of the Long Now

  • Alexander Rose speaking in Portland September 17th

    Andrew Warner
    31 Aug 2015 | 11:42 am
    On Thursday, September 17th, Alexander Rose (Executive Director of Long Now) will give a talk on how to design for 10,000 years, including how he approached many of the unique design challenges of The Clock. Thursday, September 17th 5:30 – 7:30 pm Lincoln Recital Hall (PSU) 1620 SW Park Avenue General Admission: $10 Tickets available here!  
  • 2,000-Year Old Termite Mounds Found in Central Africa

    Charlotte Hajer
    28 Aug 2015 | 11:52 am
    Much like ants, termites are a testament to the adage that a whole is greater than the sum of its parts. A single termite is an almost translucent creature, no more than a few millimeters long. But put several thousand of them together, and they become capable of building expansive structures, some reaching up as high as 17 feet. Moreover, a recent discovery suggests that some termite mounds are not only very tall, but also very old. A joint Belgian-Congolese team of geologists carbon-dated a set of four mounds in the Congo’s Miombo Woods, and found them to be between 680 and 2200 years…
  • Marie’s Dictionary

    Andrew Warner
    27 Aug 2015 | 8:32 am
    This short documentary tells the story of Marie Wilcox, the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language and the dictionary she created in an effort to keep her language alive. Long Now’s PanLex project collects dictionaries such as these with the goal of creating a universal translation engine and fighting language extinction.
  • Paul Saffo Featured on Singularity Hub’s Ask An Expert Series

    Charlotte Hajer
    17 Aug 2015 | 11:32 am
    This week’s episode of Singularity Hub’s Ask an Expert features Long Now Board member Paul Saffo. Ask an Expert is a new web series in which, well, experts answer tweeted questions about the future of technology. In this episode, Paul discusses virtual reality, weighs in on the word ‘disrupt’, and considers the possibility of having a wooly mammoth for a pet – with a quick shout-out to Long Now’s Revive & Restore project. To see more videos in the Ask an Expert series, you can visit this page. And if you have a question of your own, you can tweet it to @singularityu with…
  • Saul Griffith Seminar Tickets

    Andrew Warner
    14 Aug 2015 | 2:59 pm
      The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking Saul Griffith on “Infrastructure and Climate Change” TICKETS Monday September 21, 02015 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15   About this Seminar: So far we are trying to deal with climate change at the wrong time scale. A really deep problem cannot be solved by shallow innovations, no matter how clever. The scale of climate change requires thinking and acting in multi-decade terms at the level of infrastructure—personal as well as societal.
 
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    Accelerating Future

  • New Book: Our Accelerating Future: How Superintelligence, Nanotechnology, and Transhumanism Will Transform the Planet

    Michael Anissimov
    16 Aug 2015 | 6:49 am
    Buy it here: Look insideDetailsPreview Buy ($3.99) Our Accelerating Future Michael Anissimov Did you like the movies The Matrix or Ex Machina? If so, you will enjoy this book. It investigates the philosophy of superintelligent artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, transhumanism, cybernetics, and how they will transform our world. Zenit Books August 16, 2015 272 pages After much work, my brand new book Our Accelerating Future: How Superintelligence, Nanotechnology, and Transhumanism Will Transform the Planet is now released! Get it below as an epub/mobi/pdf package for $3.99. Click…
  • Wireless Optofluidic Systems for Programmable in Vivo Pharmacology and Optogenetics

    Michael Anissimov
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:59 am
    This is the most important brain-computer interfacing breakthrough in a long time, possibly in several years: Highlights Neural probes with ultrathin, soft microfluidic channels coupled to micro-ILEDs Optofluidic probes minimize tissue damage and are suitable for chronic implants Wireless in vivo fluid delivery of viruses, peptides, and small-molecule agents Combined wireless optogenetics with pharmacology for neural circuit dissection Summary In vivo pharmacology and optogenetics hold tremendous promise for dissection of neural circuits, cellular signaling, and manipulating…
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    Michael Anissimov
    4 Jul 2015 | 11:31 pm
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    Michael Anissimov
    4 Jul 2015 | 9:29 pm
    Join our mailing list for information about upcoming ebooks and compilations! Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international cultural and intellectual movement with an eventual goal of fundamentally transforming the human condition by developing and making widely available technologies to greatly enhance human intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities. Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations, as well as the ethics of developing and using such technologies. The most common…
  • Scientists Image an Entire Roundworm Brain in Realtime

    Michael Anissimov
    5 Feb 2014 | 12:37 am
    Microscopy is all about tradeoffs between the size of an imaged volume and spatial and temporal resolution. That is, until now. A new microscopy technique invented by researchers at the University of Vienna and MIT allows scientists to comprehensively image the neural firings of a living roundworm brain in realtime, vastly increasing the amount of data we can collect. This is the first time a microscopy technique has been used to measure neural activity in an entire animal in realtime before. The principle behind its operation is similar to how the "bullet time" sequence in The Matrix was…
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • How mass extinctions can accelerate robot evolution

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:48 pm
    At the start of the simulation, a biped robot controlled by a computationally evolved brain stands upright on a 16 meter by 16 meter surface. The simulation proceeds until the robot falls or until 15 seconds have elapsed. (credit: Joel Lehman) Robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters, such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs, computer scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have found. Mass extinctions speed up evolution by unleashing new creativity in adaptations. Computer scientists Risto Miikkulainen and…
  • Soaking up carbon dioxide and turning it into valuable products

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:08 pm
    Conceptual model showing how porphyrin COFs could be used to split CO2 into CO and oxygen (credit: Omar Yaghi, Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley) Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a system that absorbs carbon dioxide and also selectively reduces it to carbon monoxide (which serves as a primary building block for a wide range of chemical products including fuels, pharmaceuticals and plastics). The trick: they’ve incorporated molecules of carbon dioxide reduction catalysts into the sponge-like crystals of…
  • Engineered bacteria form multicellular circuit to control protein expression

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:01 pm
    Two strains of synthetically engineered bacteria cooperate to create multicellular phenomena. Their fluorescence indicates the engineered capabilities have been activated. (credit: Bennett Lab/Rice University) Rice University scientists and associates have created a biological equivalent to a computer circuit using multiple types of bacteria that change protein expression. The goal is to modify biological systems by controlling how bacteria influence each other. This could lead to bacteria that, for instance, beneficially alter the gut microbiome (collection of microorganisms) in humans.
  • Light-speed interconnects may lead to ultra-high-speed computers

    31 Aug 2015 | 5:41 pm
    Specially designed, extremely small metal structures can trap light. Once trapped, the light becomes a confined wave known as surface plasmons. The surface plasmons are represented here by the blue waves, which begin at the pump beam and are detected 250 micrometers away by the probe beam, traveling at almost as fast as light through the air. (credit: Hess et al./Nano Lett.) Light waves trapped on a metal’s surface (surface plasmons) travel farther than expected, up to 250 micrometers from the source — which may be far enough to create ultra-fast nanoelectronic circuits,…
  • Speech-classifier program is better at predicting psychosis than psychiatrists

    31 Aug 2015 | 12:27 am
    This image shows discrimination between at-risk youths who transitioned to psychosis (red) and those who did not (blue). The polyhedron contains all the at-risk youth who did NOT develop psychosis (blue). All of the at-risk youth who DID later develop psychosis (red) are outside the polyhedron. Thus the speech classifier had 100 percent discrimination or accuracy. The speech classifier consisted of “minimum semantic coherence” (the flow of meaning from one sentence to the next), and indices of reduced complexity of speech, including phrase length and decreased use of…
 
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    Next Big Future

  • Proposed Armored Nuclear Powered Cruiser Design with a Dozen Railguns

    31 Aug 2015 | 11:58 pm
    The Center for International Marine Security considers a battleship style ship design with armor and a dozen railguns.The CARN (cruiser gun armor, nuclear powered) will need to adapt the principles of the ‘armored citadel’ concepts developed a century ago for battleships to the needs of securing the two, possibly three, nuclear reactors aboard and their associated pumps and other equipment. It would be a new over 25,000 ton armored cruiser.Depending on the amount of power twelve railguns firing broadsides will require, two or three of the standardized nuclear plants.The primary use of the…
  • Proposed design for future armored warship with railguns, lasers and drones

    31 Aug 2015 | 11:30 pm
    Startpoint brings together the best teams in naval defence systems to tackle the twin challenges of providing advanced technology set against the backdrop of funding constraints. It encompasses the structures, processes, people and policies that exist to deliver equipment and support to the Royal Navy (UK).Patrick Tucker at Defense One describes the Starpoint design for a future warship called Dreadnought 2050. It is the product of an open-thought experiment at the informal request of the U.K. Ministry of Defense.The ship would be powered by hydrogen fusion — or if that proves unworkable,…
  • Largest gas field in the Mediterranean Sea off the shore of Egypt

    31 Aug 2015 | 11:18 pm
    A natural gas discovery could hold a potential of 30 trillion cubic feet of lean gas in place (5.5 billion barrels of oil equivalent in place) covering an area of about 100 square kilometres. It's the largest gas discovery ever made in Egypt and in the Mediterranean Sea and could become one of the world’s largest natural-gas finds. This exploration success, after its full development, will be able to ensure satisfying Egypt’s natural gas demand for decades.Read more »
  • Russia plans to fly new hypersonic scramjet prototypes in 2019 or 2020

    31 Aug 2015 | 3:23 pm
    Russia’s Gromov Flight Research Institute (LII) expects its latest GLL-AP-02 hypersonic scramjet test vehicle to fly in “three or four years,” with officials telling Flightglobal that funding constraints and technical issues have slowed progress.LII’s Sergei Pernitsky and Sergei Vasilievich said via a translator at the MAKS air show in Moscow that work on the flight sciences vehicle is progressing, but slowly.“Mostly because of the lack of funding, but there are lots of difficulties despite the funding because this project is very ambitious,” they explain.GLL-AP-02 is the Russian…
  • DARPA pursues launching dozens of drones from bombers, fighters and drone carriers

    31 Aug 2015 | 1:29 pm
    An ability to send large numbers of small unmanned air systems (UAS) with coordinated, distributed capabilities could provide U.S. forces with improved operational flexibility at much lower cost than is possible with today’s expensive, all-in-one platforms—especially if those unmanned systems could be retrieved for reuse while airborne. So far, however, the technology to project volleys of low-cost, reusable systems over great distances and retrieve them in mid-air has remained out of reach.To help make that technology a reality, DARPA has launched the Gremlins program. Named for the…
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    the Foresight Institute

  • Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

    Jim Lewis
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:51 pm
    Three-dimensional rendering of surface features imaged by ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging. (Source: University of Colorado). The surface shown is a portion of Fig. 4a. Judging from the scale bar in the scanning electron micrograph of this surface shown in Fig. 1b, the inner diameter of the circle is about 10 µm (10,000 nm). As we noted back in April, Richard Feynman in his classic 1959 talk challenged his fellow physicists to make the electron microscope 100 times better. A “new super powerful electron microscope that can pinpoint the position of single atoms” had…
  • A tunable bandgap by doping a few atomic layers of black phosphorous

    Jim Lewis
    29 Aug 2015 | 12:25 pm
    Phosphorene (with in-situ deposition of potassium (K) atoms to induce doping) – The natural successor to Graphene? Credit: Institute for Basic Science The process of finding novel arrangements of atoms with interesting and useful properties does not appear to be slowing. A hat tip to ScienceDaily for reprinting this news release from the Institute for Basic Science, Korea “Black Phosphorus (BP) Surges Ahead of Graphene“: A Korean team of scientists tune BP’s band gap to form a superior conductor, allowing for the application to be mass produced for electronic and…
  • Novel wireframe nanostructures from new DNA origami design process

    Jim Lewis
    18 Aug 2015 | 1:29 pm
    The versatility of the 3D wireframe design technique was demonstrated with the construction of the snub cube, an Archimedean solid with 60 edges, 24 vertices and 38 faces including 6 squares and 32 equilateral triangles. Credit: TED-43 GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons The scaffolded DNA origami technique has been extended to build complex, programmable wireframe structures exhibitng precise control of branching and curvature. A hat tip to KurzweilAI for reporting this Arizona State University Biodesign…
  • Conference video: Artificial Biochemistry with DNA

    Jim Lewis
    13 Aug 2015 | 11:32 am
    DNA as a Universal Substrate for Chemical Kinetics-http://www.pnas.org/content/107/12/5393-An embedded control circuit to direct molecular events. Credit: David Soloveichik A select set of videos from the 2013 Foresight Technical Conference: Illuminating Atomic Precision, held January 11-13, 2013 in Palo Alto, have been made available on vimeo. Videos have been posted of those presentations for which the speakers have consented. Other presentations contained confidential information and will not be posted. The fourth speaker at the Commercial Scale Devices – Part 2 session, the winner…
  • Another nanotechnology computer memory breakthrough from Feynman Prize winner

    Jim Lewis
    12 Aug 2015 | 2:19 pm
    A schematic shows the layered structure of tantalum oxide, multilayer graphene and platinum used for a new type of memory developed at Rice University. The memory device overcomes crosstalk problems that cause read errors in other devices. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) One prominent area in which nanoscale science and technology is providing a rich pipeline feeding current and near-term improvements in technology is computer hardware, and in particular, solid-state computer memories. One year ago, we cited a breakthrough nanoporous silicon oxide technology for resistive random-access…
 
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    Soft Machines

  • Innovation, research, and the UK’s productivity crisis – part 3

    Richard Jones
    27 Aug 2015 | 1:01 am
    This the third and final in a series of three posts. The first part is here, and this follows on directly from part 2. Quantifying the productivity benefits of research and development The UK’s productivity problem is an innovation problem. This conclusion follows from the analysis of Goodridge, Haskel and Wallis, at least if one equates the economist’s construction of total factor productivity with innovation. This needs some qualification, because when economists talk about innovation in this context they mean anything that allows one to produce more economic output with the same inputs…
  • Innovation, research, and the UK’s productivity crisis – part 2

    Richard Jones
    25 Aug 2015 | 12:13 pm
    This the second in a series of three posts, and continues directly from part 1. Analysing the UK’s productivity slow-down There are many theories of why the UK’s productivity growth has stalled, and in the absence of proper analysis it’s all too easy to chose a favoured hypothesis on the basis of anecdotes or a single data point, picked out to fit one’s ideological predilections. Indeed, I could be accused of doing just that, by drawing attention the UK’s weak R&D record; others might immediately start looking at a lack of competitiveness in the economy, or insufficient…
  • Innovation, research and development, and the UK’s productivity crisis – part 1

    Richard Jones
    24 Aug 2015 | 2:09 pm
    This is the first of a series of three posts in which I bring together some thinking and reading I’ve been doing about the UK’s current productivity problem, and its relationship to innovation and to research and development. In part 1, here, I take stock of the scale of the UK’s productivity problem and discuss why it matters so much, both economically and politically. Then I’ll set the context for the following discussion with a provocative association between productivity growth and R&D intensity. In part 2, I’ll review what can be said with more careful…
  • I chose to graduate

    Richard Jones
    20 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    I’m sure there are some people who, very early on in their lives, work out what they want to do and then set out single-mindedly to achieve their aims. For the rest of us, choices are made and paths are set without us really being conscious of those junctions, so we look back and wonder how was it that our lives unfolded in this way and not in another. And yet, looking back, we sometimes can see moments, or short periods, that were decisive in setting us down one path and cutting off other possibilities. For me, the summer of 1982 was the time that determined that I was going to end up…
  • Did the government build the iPhone? Would the iPhone have happened without governments?

    Richard Jones
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:29 am
    The iPhone must be one of the most instantly recognisable symbols of the modern “tech economy”. So, it was an astute choice by Mariana Mazzacuto to put it at the centre of her argument about the importance of governments in driving the development of technology. Mazzacuto’s book – The Entrepreneurial State – argues that technologies like the iPhone depended on the ability and willingness of governments to take on technological risks that the private sector is not prepared to assume. She notes also that it is that same private sector which captures the rewards of the…
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    Broader Perspective

  • Economic Liberation: Network Economics of Abundance

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:58 am
    Economics as API: System DesignThe possibility of designing personalized economic systems raises a host of issues about what kinds of behavior might result from programmed economic parameters. In moving from indirect advertiser-supported models to direct peer-supported models, for example, one first issue might be the business model - which parts of the system should (can) be free and which paid? For any paid parts, certain externalities and artificial behaviors might be created. P2P Business ModelOne of the great values of peer-produced commons goods like Wikipedia is that it is…
  • Network Economies: Economic System as a Configurable Parameter

    24 Aug 2015 | 8:00 pm
    We personalize everything else, why not economic systems too? Starbucks selectability comes to economic system participations! Some interesting implications for personalized economic system design arise per a recent post about ‘Decentralized Reddit.’ The New World: Network EconomiesThere are two archetypal economic systems. First is the usual indirect model that we are used to as consumers: content is free to consume, and supported by advertising, where personalized data might be sold in the backend to other parties in any number of undisclosed ways; this is true for radio, TV, and…
  • Personalized Economic Systems: Self-Determination and Economic Theory

    18 Aug 2015 | 5:16 am
    In addition to blockchain technology, another clear node of current innovation is in self-determined economic systems. Increasingly, as individuals, we are consciously examining the economic systems into which we were born by default, and questioning their validity, utility, and reach; and proposing alternatives. In some sense capitalism is the new feudalism and there is a finally starting to be the conception and realization of a viable postcapitalist position. The new sensibility could be that economic systems are determined at the level of the individual as opposed to the level of the…
  • Smartgrid Life: Blockchain Cryptosustainability

    10 Aug 2015 | 11:50 am
    The contemporary era of blockchains as an implementation mechanism for decentralization suggests a new overall conceptualization of life as being supported by any number of smartgrids. Distributed network grids is a familiar idea for resources such as water, electricity, health services, and Internet access, and might be extended to other resources, literally and conceptually. One example is on-demand microcoaching, for example guidance for playing a certain guitar solo with Piano++. Jeremy Rifkin, in Zero Marginal Cost Society and other books, outlines the grid paradigm, contemplating three…
  • Popup Dining as Distributed Autonomous Space

    2 Aug 2015 | 4:17 pm
    Popup dining could be a fun new idea in the trend of popup experiences - on-demand serendipity and practicality ranging from popup entertainment, co-housing, and co-working to popup farms on disused land. Any range of food providers ranging from existing restaurants to individuals building cooking brands could sponsor on-demand popup dining tables in city streets and at festivals.Consumers could pre-select the menu (including a blind prix fixe menu), and the time and location of the popup dining experience. At the appointed time and location, ad-hoc P2P urban delivery service contractors…
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    Overcoming Bias

  • If Post Filter, We Are Alone

    Robin Hanson
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:15 am
    Me four years ago: Imagine that over the entire past and future history of our galaxy, human-level life would be expected to arise spontaneously on about one hundred planets. At least it would if those planets were not disturbed by outsiders. Imagine also that, once life on a planet reaches a human level, it is likely to quickly (e.g., within a million years) expand to permanently colonize the galaxy. And imagine life rarely crosses between galaxies. In this case we should expect Earth to be one of the first few habitable planets created, since otherwise Earth would likely have already been…
  • Why Have Opinions?

    Robin Hanson
    29 Aug 2015 | 6:42 am
    I just surprised some people here at a conference by saying that I don’t have opinions on abortion or gun control. I have little use for such opinions, and so haven’t bothered to form them. Since that attitude seems to be unusual among my intellectual peers, let me explain myself. I see four main kinds of reasons to have opinions on subjects: Decisions – Sometimes I need to make concrete decisions where the best choice depends on particular key facts or values. In such cases I am forced to have opinions on those subjects, in order to make good decisions. I may well just adopt,…
  • Excess Turbulence?

    Robin Hanson
    24 Aug 2015 | 9:05 am
    To help me imagine how different future cultures might be, I’ve been trying to learn about typical lives of our distant ancestors. One excellent source is Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error by Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie in 1978. Around 1300 Jacquest Fournier, who eventually became pope but was then a bishop, led an Inquisition against heretics in the small town of Montaillou in southern France, population 200. He transcribed several years worth of interviews of them, revealing great detail about ordinary life there. One tidbit: Instability was the hallmark of a shepard’s life, as of the…
  • Life’s Laminar Endgame

    Robin Hanson
    20 Aug 2015 | 7:20 am
    I turn 56 in a week, and I’ve been thinking about how life changes with age. I’ve come up with a view expressed in terms of two key distinctions: Foregame vs. Endgame Actions in games often have both direct local immediate consequences, and also more indirect global delayed consequences, such as those that result from how other players react to your actions, then more others react to those actions, and so on. The longer a game that stretches ahead, and the more other players who interact, the more that these indirect consequences can matter. In contrast, at the end of a game there are…
  • Yay Soda Firms

    Robin Hanson
    16 Aug 2015 | 5:45 am
    It is usually bad for people to die, and so good for them to keep living. Overall in our society, people who weigh more for their age and gender tend to die more, and so many are concerned about an “obesity epidemic”, and seek ways to reduce people’s weight, such as by getting them to consume fewer calories. Such as from drinking sugary soda. TIME magazine says that evil soda firms, like evil tobacco firms before them, are lying about science to distract us from their evil: You may not have noticed it yet, but sodamakers are working hard to get you off your couch. On Aug. 9, a New York…
 
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

  • Distant planet's interior chemistry may differ from our own

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:00 am
    As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. New work from a team including three Carnegie scientists demonstrates that different magnesium compounds could be abundant inside other planets as compared to Earth. Their work is published by Scientific Reports.
  • Butterfly wings help break the status quo in gas sensing

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:00 am
    The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors.
  • First global antineutrino emission map highlights Earth's energy budget

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:00 am
    The neutrino and its antimatter cousin, the antineutrino, are the tiniest subatomic particles known to science. These particles are byproducts of nuclear reactions within stars (including our sun), supernovae, black holes and human-made nuclear reactors. They also result from radioactive decay processes deep within the Earth, where radioactive heat and the heat left over from the planet's formation fuels plate tectonics, volcanoes and Earth's magnetic field.
  • Neural algorithm gives photo masterpiece-style treatments

    1 Sep 2015 | 2:00 am
    Computer scientists are intrigued about what computers can tell us about artistic masterpieces, from picking out forgeries to assessing artistic worth.
  • Tech Tips: Windows 10 privacy settings worth checking

    1 Sep 2015 | 1:00 am
    Microsoft's new Windows 10 system offers more personalization than before, but it also collects more data than people might be used to on PCs, from contacts and appointments to their physical location and even Wi-Fi passwords.
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    The Fourth Revolution Blog

  • Why Being a True Artist Requires Being a Sales Person As Well

    Jeremie Averous
    29 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    If you are a creator or artist, marketing and selling is as important as creating. The artist that only concentrates on his art does not contribute to the world, because the world does not know what he does! “Art, without distribution and discovery, moves nobody. Did it ever exist? […]Will it make an impact? […]  Thought, if not written down and shared with others, changes nothing. Does it matter? ” writes Scott Belsky in ‘Make Your Mark: The Creative’s Guide to Building a Business with Impact‘. He continues: “Creation must be made accessible…
  • How All Great New Truths Will Be Resisted Emotionally

    Jeremie Averous
    27 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    “All great truths begin as blasphemies” — is a widely quoted sentence written by George Bernard Shaw. The meaning of blasphemy here is of course, insult towards something considered sacred and inviolable – another truth. This quote is interesting because it creates a few problems by itself. It implies that a truth can only be relative or timely, because a new truth will necessarily replace an old truth (hence the blasphemy). It also implies that the arising of a new truth will be resisted by society, which is certainly reasonable – and we observe every day when well…
  • How the Fourth Revolution Definitely Made Reductionism Obsolete

    Jeremie Averous
    25 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    Antireductionism “advocates that not all properties of a system can be explained in terms of its constituent parts and their interactions” [Wikipedia]. It stands opposed to reductionism, the approach typical of the Industrial Age, which considered that the behavior of entire systems can be explained completely by a description of their individual constituent parts and their interactions. In the 18th century people thought animals could be described as a mechanical apparatus Already the philosophers of Enlightment struggled a bit with reductionism that was contradicting our…
  • How the Internet Has Become the Nervous System of the 21st Century

    Jeremie Averous
    22 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    “The internet has become the nervous system of the 21st century, wiring together devices that we carry, devices that are in our bodies, devices that our bodies are in“. This observation is from Cory Doctorow in a great column in the Guardian ‘The internet is the answer to all the questions of our time’. A map of the internet. Doesn’t it look like a neuron map? Internet is now the location where all the societal fights will be won or lost. It is increasingly the dominating medium of all the conversations that really matter. And following on his usual battle cry…
  • How to Discover More About People: Play!

    Jeremie Averous
    20 Aug 2015 | 4:30 am
    Long ago, Plato said: “You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.” An unhappy player that expressed his disappointment physically It is particularly true I find when it comes to the emotional reactions of people who lose, or even simply by observing how much people can get involved in the game. It is to a point where it is surprising that recruiters haven’t thought to include group games as part of their selection process (some do, but they are rare). It would also allow to observe whether people are team players, or rather seek to…
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    Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra

  • How cheap can solar get? Very cheap indeed.

    Ramez Naam
    12 Aug 2015 | 5:36 pm
    Originally posted on August 10, 2015 at the RamezNaam Blog, by Ramez Naam What’s the future price of solar? I’ll attempt to make some projections (tentatively) here. If current rates of improvement hold, solar will be incredibly cheap by the time it’s a substantial fraction of the world’s electricity supply. Background: The Exponential Decline in Solar Module Costs It’s now fairly common knowledge that the cost of solar modules is dropping exponentially. I helped publicize that fact in a 2011 Scientific American blog post asking “Does Moore’s Law Apply to Solar Cells?” The…
  • Remembering Dennis Walsh

    Glen Hiemstra
    6 Aug 2015 | 9:23 am
    We have learned that colleague and friend Dennis Walsh died suddenly last week on July 29, 2015 at his home of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. He is survived by his wife Britt and sons Matt and Jon. I met Dennis a few years ago when he came to Seattle as part of a team leading a new vision retreat for a local University, and I was a participant in the retreat. Dennis impressed me then as warm and especially thoughtful about the future. Through several years of conversation and occasional collaboration I learned that Dennis was really the definition of a kind and gentle and humble soul. He was a…
  • Water a future issue – Western Drought

    Glen Hiemstra
    30 Jul 2015 | 1:02 pm
    The future of water and Western drought are in the headlines. A major El Nino event is shaping up that could, while temporarily bringing rain to California, actually make the Western drought worse in the coming year. Canada’s Prairies have just experienced their driest winter and spring in 68 years of record keeping. “So they were behind the eight-ball before the summer season ever came,” says Phillips. That, coupled with a record low snow pack in North America, and few of the traditional June rains needed to grow crops, has had a cumulative effect that’s hit some…
  • Vision is the Star that You Steer By – future thoughts

    Glen Hiemstra
    24 Jul 2015 | 10:00 am
    Preferred Vision is the Star the You Steer By The preferred future vision becomes the star that you steer by, not a simple map to be followed. I wrote these words for the first time years ago when I was working on what is still one of the best and most intensive preferred future planning projects I’ve ever done. It was with a state Department of Natural Resources, and I was leading them in the development of a 15-year vision and strategic plan, working with a treasured colleague who then directed a program in Organization Systems Renewal. The cool thing about this project, actually…
  • Future mega-drought chances

    Glen Hiemstra
    23 Jul 2015 | 3:00 pm
    Future mega-drought chances according to NASA study… Lake Shasta before drought… Lake Shasta Before Drought (weatherextreme.com) Lake Shasta now in drought… Lake Shasta After Drought (weatherextreme.com) See more comparisons at weatherextreme.com. How will we cope if drought becomes mega? It’s not just a California problem. The post Future mega-drought chances appeared first on Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra.
 
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    XYZ University

  • How helicopter parents changed the workforce

    Sarah Sladek
    19 Aug 2015 | 10:59 am
    It’s back to school time, and as you prep your little darlings for another year of education, take some time to reflect on your own school experiences. Chances are, if you were born before 1982, you walked to school (up hill both ways), ate mystery meat in the cafeteria, suffered through bullying, and wrote letters to pen pals with a No. 2 pencil – in cursive, of course! But if you were born in 1982 or later, you were part of the most protected and supervised generation in history. The Millennials. Gen Y. Which means you were probably shuttled to school and countless other…
  • Gen Z and Your Business: BFFs or SnapChat?

    Sarah Sladek
    14 May 2015 | 7:15 am
    Just as companies are coming to terms with the wave of Gen Ys, another generation is creeping up behind them. Generation Z — the oldest who are turning 19 — are moving en masse into entry-level jobs, colleges, and internships. Born in the late 1990s and early 2000s they make up a quarter of the population and have little in common with their Gen Y predecessors. Here’s what you need to know about Z. Texting Fifty percent of Generation Zs send at least 50 texts each day. Seriously. Fifty texts a day. Another amazing stat: a whopping 93 percent of Zs use YouTube to view,…
  • Knowing Y in Holland

    Sarah Sladek
    6 Apr 2015 | 11:30 am
    Generation Y. Millennials. Echo Boomers. Trophy Generation. Regardless of how you refer to them, organizations worldwide are really perplexed by the generation of young adults now moving into the majority of the workforce and consumer spending. On March 25 and 26, I traveled to Holland to present at the VM Spring Conference on the topic of my latest book, Knowing Y: Engage the Next Generation Now. During my visit, I was present for the announcement of De Nederlandse Associatie—a new association for association executives, which is launching this fall. I also had the opportunity to meet with…
  • The World’s Aging Workforce and What Your Business Should Do About It

    Sarah Sladek
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:09 am
      XYZ University publishes Scary Stats each Halloween, and this latest stat just might be the scariest of 2015: Despite projected growth in the global population from 6.9 billion to 7.6 billion in 2020, the working-age population is expected to decline. In fact, aging will likely add 360 million older people (Baby Boomers) to the world’s pool of those not participating in the labor force. There are few exceptions to this aging trend. India’s workforce is getting younger with one-third of the country’s population under the age of 15. Other developing market economies with young…
  • Rookie Talent: Avoiding a Kodak Moment

    Sarah Sladek
    7 Jan 2015 | 2:07 am
    During most of the 20th century Kodak held a dominant position in photographic film, and in 1976, had an 89% market share of photographic film sales in the United States. Kodak began to struggle financially in the late 1990s as a result of the decline in sales of photographic film and its slowness in transitioning to digital photography. In 2012, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The Kodak name became synonymous with a resistance to change, but it’s not just innovation the company lacked. In 2011, Kodak made the list of Top 10 Fortune 500 Employers With Older Workers,…
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    Singularitarian

  • Space Elevators Are Totally Possible (If Someone Will Just Pay for It)

    28 Aug 2015 | 10:16 am
    Space Elevators Are Totally Possible (If Someone Will Just Pay for It): “This would of course all go a lot faster if we had, you know, money.”  That was the defining topic at this year’s annual meeting of the International Space Elevator Consortium (ISEC) in Seattle last week, which saw scientists gather from around the world to plot the next step in humanity’s march to space.
  • A Startup With No Website Just Announced a Major Fusion Breakthrough

    27 Aug 2015 | 10:03 am
    A Startup With No Website Just Announced a Major Fusion Breakthrough: A small startup has announced a major advance toward fusion power, the Holy Grail of energy that could rid us of fossil fuels forever. Tri Alpha Energy says it’s built a machine that can hold a hot blob of plasma steady at 10 million degrees Celsius for five whole milliseconds.
  • Boston Dynamics’ Atlas Robot Tested Outside

    18 Aug 2015 | 1:48 pm
    Boston Dynamics’ Atlas Robot Tested Outside
  • LG Display Unveils Incredible New Flexible Televisions

    13 Aug 2015 | 2:26 pm
    LG Display Unveils Incredible New Flexible Televisions: LG Display continues to be the leading pioneer in flexible technology - debuting its new flexible TV panel at an event in Korea this week.
  • These Superhumans Are Real and Their DNA Could Be Worth Billions

    4 Aug 2015 | 12:56 pm
    These Superhumans Are Real and Their DNA Could Be Worth Billions: Steven Pete can put his hand on a hot stove or step on a piece of glass and not feel a thing, all because of a quirk in his genes. Only a few dozen people in the world share Pete’s congenital insensitivity to pain. Drug companies see riches in his rare mutation. They also have their eye on people like Timothy Dreyer, 25, who has bones so dense he could walk away from accidents that would leave others with broken limbs. About 100 people have sclerosteosis, Dreyer’s condition.
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    Extravolution

  • Frozen to Life: A Personal Mortality Experiment

    nuncio
    22 Aug 2015 | 5:29 am
    For the last four years, I've been writing a book. Frozen to Life: A Personal Mortality Experiment is about death, life, severed-head cryonics, Buddhism, love and philosophy of personal identity. People keep mistaking it for a fabrication, classifying it as fiction or science fiction. If you read it, something might happen to your mind. Something happened to mine while writing it.
  • Conditioned Existence

    nuncio
    12 Apr 2015 | 2:30 am
    Buddhism says that all existence is ‘conditioned’ – it is all conditional on other conditions. Like the theory of relativity, the theory of conditioning allows no absolutes. I am not a Buddhist. It would make no sense to be one, because belief is a form of conditioning. Buddhism is a self-solving metaphilosophical riddle designed to break minds free of all forms of indoctrination. It also says that conditioned existence is suffering (dukkha As all existence is conditioned, then, all existence is suffering. How can that be? We seem to know when we are suffering as opposed to happy or…
  • The Cosmic Tug of Love

    nuncio
    14 Feb 2015 | 9:46 am
    Massive objects bend spacetime. The ISS falls around the edge of earth’s gravity well, held close to the terrestrial bosom. With enough delta-v, it could quit that tender aureole for the infinite, star-studded void.A loving gravitational embrace? In another sense, it’s a hateful thing – to be dragged back with such violence whenever we try to escape this grasping, spinning ball of rock. Thus far, chemical rockets are our only means of achieving the escape velocity of 40,000 km/h needed to leave home. The determination and resources required for such a small step into the darkness are…
  • Under My Skin

    nuncio
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:16 am
    What is it with the night? Fears and confusions are so amped when I wake in the darkness, usually around 3am. Having fought my way out of the interdimensional void – my version more akin to Clive Barker’s ‘In Ovo’ – the sweat from my exertions was cooling but still slick.I shouldn’t watch them. With a brain so susceptible to visual imprinting, I should leave the horror movies to more resilient consumers. Strange. In my waking hours, all is processed narrative; wordling I. Asleep, however, visual phantasmagoria manifests. In the opus born in my CSF-bathed complex of neurons, other…
  • If I Only had an Emotion Chip

    nuncio
    2 Jul 2014 | 5:57 am
    Image ©Bulent Yusuf The non-biological entity lacking the ability to emote – it’s a familiar tale. He’s Data in Star Trek , he’s the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz , he/she/it is most of the sci-fi robots you’ve ever read about or seen in movies. The mythology of animate beings possessed of human form but not of human sentiments is ancient. In Jewish folklore, rabbis channelling the power of God raised magical ‘golems’ fashioned from mud. Though usually intended to protect their maker and his people, these beings sometimes ran amok, their self-control and moral judgement…
 
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    Getting Through High School

  • The Misunderstanding (The Hospital Series Part 8)

    30 Aug 2015 | 4:18 pm
    Today, I returned to the hospital after a somewhat extended vacation. I missed the feeling of walking on the floor, pretending to be a doctor and whatnot. There was no exception today. My shift today was very busy. I was literally on my feet the entire time.When I first got on the floor, I was shocked at how busy it was. Nurses streamed past me and monitors beeped in almost every room. Now, this is at 8 in the morning. Usually the floor is quiet and some nurses would be walking around making periodic checks on patients since most were still asleep.Speaking of asleep, I definitely hadn't woken…
  • Last Minute Jitters

    24 Aug 2015 | 3:28 pm
    Lemme guess, you've procrastinated. Be it your summer assignment or your first homework of the year, you probably waited until the last minute to start. It's not your fault, right? I mean, you had so much fun this summer that doing the assignment would mean conceding that school is starting again. I get it.The program I'm in at my high school required us to write a 4,000 word research paper over the summer, and made it due today. Naturally, I had classmates who, for some reason, waited until a few days ago to begin. Now, if you're familiar with writing research papers, you should know that a…
  • The Last First Day and Then...Today

    18 Aug 2015 | 2:01 pm
    Welcome people! Today was the second last day of school for me! It isn't quite exciting as the First Last Day of school, which is why I probably won't ever mention it again. I figured I 'd compile the experiences from yesterday and today into one post because why not? It might be more interesting anyway!So yesterday, the first day of school, went off without a hitch. I have great teachers, a few of which I've already had a class in. It also helps that I know all of my classmates too. I won't get into the details about each and every class, but I will tell you that my schedule is pretty…
  • First Day of School!

    17 Aug 2015 | 4:19 pm
    Hey everyone! So it's the first day of school! At least, for kids where I live!! I was extra excited about today because I'm finally a senior. Normally, seniors have a mixture of emotions knowing it's their last year in high school, but not me! All I feel is pure excitement! I have classes with all of my friends and super great teachers. I can already tell that this year is going to be great.So, I can't really tell you guys what the post schedule will be this time around until I know how my after-school activities are looking, but stay on the lookout! I'll try to post as often as possible.
  • Next Up to The Plate: College!

    22 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Hiya all! I know, I've disappeared over the last few weeks. We can chalk that up to "enjoying my summer" for now! What matters is that I'm back! You might be getting this vibe from the title of the post that this is gonna be advice for getting ready for college and all that, but it isn't! Well, sort of. This is just basically a personal piece about my feelings about college and applying in just a few short months. I would really like it if anyone shared their own experiences! You can type it in the comment box below, or email it to me and I'll leave your name out of it. That way, anyone…
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