Future

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  • Peter Schwartz: The Starships ARE Coming — A Seminar Flashback

    Blog of the Long Now
    Mikl Em
    12 Sep 2014 | 12:10 pm
    In September 02013 futurist Peter Schwartz spoke for Long Now about realistic scenarios for human interstellar travel. Peter, a founding Long Now Board member, participated in “The 100-year Starship” project and contributed to the book Starship Century (Edited by Gregory Benford and James Benford) with scientists and science fiction authors positing realistic ways humanity could voyage beyond our Solar System. Our September Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) ”flashbacks” highlight Space-themed talks, as we lead up to Ariel Waldman’s The Future of Human…
  • Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies

    KurzweilAI » News
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:47 pm
    NIBIB Bionic Man (click image to go the interactive site) (credit: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that showcases cutting-edge research in biotechnology. The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers. Examples include a powered prosthetic leg that helps users achieve a more natural gait, a wireless brain-computer interface that lets people who are paralyzed control computer devices or…
  • Berlin Videos

    Open the Future
    Jamais Cascio
    9 Sep 2014 | 12:19 pm
    The Climate Engineering Conference 2014 in Berlin has uploaded the videos of all plenary sessions, available here. (http://www.ce-conference.org/conference-videos) The Berlin Museum talk I posted below can be listened to here: Climate Engineering and the Meaning of Nature (Jamais Cascio) (I had just finished writing the talk -- I scripted it to stay within a very strict time limit -- so I spend more time than I should looking down. Better to listen to than to watch, I think.) My brief digression on the nature of futurism in the context of thinking about the environment (a last bit of the last…
  • US Air Force Research Lab targets first hypersonic aircraft test by 2019 and hypersonic cruise missiles by the 2020s and laser cannons on fighters in the 2030s

    Next Big Future
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:31 pm
    The head of the Air Force Research Laboratory on Sept. 16 said the first test of a hypersonic aircraft could come within five years, and the technology could be applied to cruise missiles by the 2020s.Maj. Gen. Tom Masiello, commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory, said hypersonics is one of the most promising technologies the lab is working on. It is currently testing the Boeing X-51 WaveRider unmanned hypersonic vehicle.Read more »
  • Novel multifunctional nanoparticle for diagnosis and therapy

    the Foresight Institute
    Jim Lewis
    14 Sep 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Schematic illustration of construction of a multifunctional nanoparticle (credit: Yuanpei Li et al./Nature Communications) A variety of nanoparticles have been designed for multiple nanomedical purposes. An article at KurzweilAI.net presents news from UC Davis of a “nanoporphyrin” platform for developing multifunctional nanoparticles based upon treelike dendrimer structures made using porphyrin, cholic acid, amino acids, and polyethylene glycol “A multifunctional medical nanoparticle“: Researchers at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions have…
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    Blog of the Long Now

  • Peter Schwartz: The Starships ARE Coming — A Seminar Flashback

    Mikl Em
    12 Sep 2014 | 12:10 pm
    In September 02013 futurist Peter Schwartz spoke for Long Now about realistic scenarios for human interstellar travel. Peter, a founding Long Now Board member, participated in “The 100-year Starship” project and contributed to the book Starship Century (Edited by Gregory Benford and James Benford) with scientists and science fiction authors positing realistic ways humanity could voyage beyond our Solar System. Our September Seminar About Long-term Thinking (SALT) ”flashbacks” highlight Space-themed talks, as we lead up to Ariel Waldman’s The Future of Human…
  • Revive & Restore Update at the Commonwealth Club September 18, 02014

    Andrew Warner
    10 Sep 2014 | 3:30 pm
    On Thursday, September 18th, Ryan Phelan and Stewart Brand will be giving an update on the Revive & Restore project at the Commonwealth Club of California. The talk will explore the flagship project of Revive, The Great Passenger Pigeon Comeback, as well as several other projects that have come to fruition since Stewart gave his SALT in 02013. Some of these projects, like Ferreting the Genome, focus on using genetic technology to help species at the brink of extinction that need more genetic variability in their population, while others, like the Heath Hen project, focus on new candidates…
  • The Future Declassified at The Interval: Tuesday September 23, 02014

    Mikl Em
    5 Sep 2014 | 12:31 pm
    Our next talk at The Interval takes as its subject the complexities of our collective global future: Mathew Burrows: The Future Declassified hosted by Paul Saffo Tuesday September 23, 02014 at 7:30pm at The Interval (doors at 6:30) Advanced Tickets are encouraged as space is limited The volatility of today’s world is apparent just by reviewing the day’s headlines. Across the globe, the pressures of population growth, environmental change, and constant technological disruption are just a few of the factors that promise to influence how governments, economies, and individual…
  • Drew Endy Seminar Primer

    Charlotte Hajer
    3 Sep 2014 | 1:11 pm
    On Tuesday, September 16th, Drew Endy presents “The iGEM Revolution“ as part of our monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking. Each month, our Seminar Primer gives you some background about the speaker, including links to explore even more. From Adventures in Synthetic Biology, by Drew Endy Biotechnology is a young science, but it’s already proven its (potential) benefit to civilization. We can now engineer bacteria to manufacture life-saving drugs, we have new ways to diagnose disease, and we know how to modify the genome of plants so they become resistant to certain pests. Yet so far,…
  • We are Walking Rocks: Friends of the Pleistocene Explore the Geologic Now

    Charlotte Hajer
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:55 pm
    In The Life and Death of Buildings: On Photography and Time Joel Smith writes: Imagine making a picture using film so insensitive to light – so slow, in photographic parlance – that to burn an image onto it required an exposure of twenty-five centuries. Geologically speaking, the blink of an eye. The picture from that negative would reveal a world made of stone, and stone only. It would be a world where plants and people, seasons and civilizations, had come and gone, quite untouched, and unbothered, by mankind. And yet, here it is, a world, unmistakably shaped by human hands.
 
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies

    17 Sep 2014 | 7:47 pm
    NIBIB Bionic Man (click image to go the interactive site) (credit: National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that showcases cutting-edge research in biotechnology. The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers. Examples include a powered prosthetic leg that helps users achieve a more natural gait, a wireless brain-computer interface that lets people who are paralyzed control computer devices or…
  • Visualizing how TMS affects groups of neurons in real time

    17 Sep 2014 | 1:42 am
    Spatiotemporal activity patterns induced by a single TMS pulse (left) and 10 Hz TMS (right) over 50 milliseconds (credit: Vladislav Kozyre et al./PNAS) German neuroscientists have developed a method for recording the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on animals in real time, using voltage-sensitive dyes, which emit fluorescent light signals that indicate which groups of neurons are activated or inhibited. Using fMRI is too slow to show real-time effects, and with rapid measurement methods like EEG and MEG, the TMS magnetic field generates artifacts. So RUB researchers headed…
  • How to quickly convert human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells

    16 Sep 2014 | 11:04 pm
    Skin cells converted to white blood cells present functional immunological properties. In the picture, a representative example of a converted cell in which phagocytosis, the process by which certain white blood cells “eat” pathogens, has taken place. Green indicates internalized “beads” used as an in vitro surrogate for bacteria. Red indicates lysosomes, the “digestive” organelle of macrophages. Yellow (highlighted with arrow) indicates targeting of the internalized beads to the lysosomes. (Credit: J. Pulicio et al./Stem Cells) Salk Institute scientists have turned human skin…
  • Competing teams announced for $1 million prize incentive to create an artificial liver

    16 Sep 2014 | 7:51 pm
    The U.S. organ waiting list has grown rapidly, while the number of organ donors and available transplants has stagnated — but the true need for transplants is almost 10x larger than the waiting list suggests: 900,000 U.S. annual deaths could be prevented or significantly delayed by organ transplantation. (Credit: New Organ/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network)  New Organ — a collective initiative for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine — announced today (Sept. 16) the initial six teams competing for the $1 million New Organ Liver Prize, a global prize…
  • Camouflaging metamaterials create the LCD color display of the future

    16 Sep 2014 | 2:25 am
    Rice University’s new color display technology is capable of producing dozens of colors, including rich red, green and blue tones comparable to those found in high-definition LCD displays. (credit: J. Olson/Rice University) The quest to create camouflaging metamaterials that can “see” colors and automatically blend into the background is one step closer to reality, thanks to a breakthrough color-display technology unveiled this week by Rice University‘s Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP). The new full-color display technology uses aluminum nanorods to create the vivid…
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    Open the Future

  • Berlin Videos

    Jamais Cascio
    9 Sep 2014 | 12:19 pm
    The Climate Engineering Conference 2014 in Berlin has uploaded the videos of all plenary sessions, available here. (http://www.ce-conference.org/conference-videos) The Berlin Museum talk I posted below can be listened to here: Climate Engineering and the Meaning of Nature (Jamais Cascio) (I had just finished writing the talk -- I scripted it to stay within a very strict time limit -- so I spend more time than I should looking down. Better to listen to than to watch, I think.) My brief digression on the nature of futurism in the context of thinking about the environment (a last bit of the last…
  • Talking About Extinction In Front of Dinosaurs

    Jamais Cascio
    25 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    I'm back from the first Climate Engineering Conference, held in Berlin. Quite a good trip, but in many ways the highlight was the talk I gave at the Berlin Natural History Museum. The gathering took place in the dinosaur room, which holds (among other treasures) the "Berlin Specimen" Archaeopteryx fossil, among the most famous and most important fossils ever discovered. The acoustics of the place, however, were terrible, so I don't know how well any recordings will turn out. Fortunately, I had to script my talk, so I can offer the full text of what I said: I’ve been doing foresight work…
  • TEDx in Marin

    Jamais Cascio
    1 Aug 2014 | 11:32 am
    So, the second announcement can now be revealed: I'm one of the speakers at the 2014 TEDx Marin event on September 18. I'll be talking about the Magna Cortica, and will be speaking alongside my IFTF colleague Miriam Lueck Avery (talking about the microbiome), CEO of the Center for Investigative Reporting Joaquin Alvorado (talking about reinventing journalism), UC Berkeley Professor Ananya Roy (talking about patriarchy and power), and Kenyatta Leal, former San Quentin inmate (talking about how education and entrepreneurship can transform prison). TEDx events can be a bit of a gamble; there…
  • Climate Engineering in Berlin

    Jamais Cascio
    30 Jun 2014 | 11:22 am
    Okay, first of a few announcements (posting as they become public): In August, I'll be speaking in Berlin, Germany at the Climate Engineering Conference 2014. A major multi-day event, CEC2014 covers the gamut of climate engineering/geoengineering issues, from science to policy to media. I'm on two panels, and then a special extra event. On Tuesday August 19, I'll be part of the panel entitled CLIMATE ENGINEERING & HUMAN ENGINEERING: SOCIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES IN THE ANTHROPOCENE, talking about "From the Anthropocene to the Noöcene": Natural climate change is a well-understood…
  • Magna Cortica

    Jamais Cascio
    13 May 2014 | 12:33 pm
    One of the projects I worked on for the Institute for the Future's 2014 Ten-Year Forecast was Magna Cortica, a proposal to create an overarching set of ethical guidelines and design principles to shape the ways in which we develop and deploy the technologies of brain enhancement over the coming years. The forecast seemed to strike a nerve for many people -- a combination of the topic and the surprisingly evocative name, I suspect. Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic Monthly wrote a very good piece on the Ten-Year Forecast, focusing on Magna Cortica, and Popular Science subsequently picked up on…
 
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    the Foresight Institute

  • Novel multifunctional nanoparticle for diagnosis and therapy

    Jim Lewis
    14 Sep 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Schematic illustration of construction of a multifunctional nanoparticle (credit: Yuanpei Li et al./Nature Communications) A variety of nanoparticles have been designed for multiple nanomedical purposes. An article at KurzweilAI.net presents news from UC Davis of a “nanoporphyrin” platform for developing multifunctional nanoparticles based upon treelike dendrimer structures made using porphyrin, cholic acid, amino acids, and polyethylene glycol “A multifunctional medical nanoparticle“: Researchers at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions have…
  • Proof of principle for nanoscale assembly line

    Jim Lewis
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:02 pm
    The assembly carrier moves through several reaction chambres where different molecules bind to its surface. The graph below shows the trajectory of a single shuttle. (Graphics: from Steuerwald et al. 2014) One step toward nanofactories for atomically precise manufacturing would be the development of nanoscale production lines for assembling molecular cargo or other nanostructures into larger functional devices. Over the past few years we have cited here various advances toward this goal based on structural DNA nanotechnology, such as DNA walkers moving along tracks formed by DNA origami:…
  • DARPA announces new program on nanoscale assembly and integration

    Jim Lewis
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Image courtesy of DARPA One of the most innovative funding agencies has announced a new program aimed at assembling three-dimensional systems from the “atomic scale.” DARPA will explain the new initiative in a webinar on September 9 and 11. Deadline for registering is September 5 at 5 PM Eastern time for US citizens; see the DARPA site for non-US citizen registration info. Those of us who pursue atomically-precise manufacturing will want to view this webinar http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Releases/2014/08/22.aspx: ATOMS TO PRODUCT: AIMING TO MAKE NANOSCALE BENEFITS LIFE-SIZED New…
  • What kind of nanomachines will advanced nanotechnology use?

    Jim Lewis
    31 Aug 2014 | 5:29 pm
    Dr. Richard Jones Long-term readers of Nanodot will be familiar with the work of Richard Jones, a UK physicist and author of Soft Machines: Nanotechnology and Life, reviewed in Foresight Update Number 55 (2005) page 10. Basically Jones follows Eric Drexler’s lead in Engines of Creation in arguing that the molecular machinery found in nature provides an existence proof of an advanced nanotechnology of enormous capabilities. However, he cites the very different physics governing biomolecular machinery operating in an aqueous environment on the one hand, and macroscopic machine tools of…
  • Seeing and touching a single synthetic molecular machine

    Jim Lewis
    24 Aug 2014 | 5:42 pm
    Schematic illustration for single-molecule motion capturing and manipulation of 1-nm sized synthetic molecular machine by optical microscopy using a bead probe. A large bead attached to the rotor part of the synthetic molecular bearing (double decker porphyrin) traces its motion. credit Tomohiro Ikeda Molecular machines are a central component of efforts to develop atomically precise manufacturing. Optical microscopy and optical trap manipulation of single molecules, made possible by attachment of micrometer-scale beads, have facilitated greater understanding of the workings of biomolecular…
 
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    Soft Machines

  • Your mind will not be uploaded

    Richard Jones
    14 Sep 2014 | 2:12 am
    The recent movie “Transcendence” will not be troubling the sci-fi canon of classics, if the reviews are anything to go by. But its central plot device – “uploading” a human consciousness to a computer – remains both a central aspiration of transhumanists, and a source of queasy fascination to the rest of us. The idea is that someone’s mind is simply a computer programme, that in the future could be run on a much more powerful computer than a brain, just as one might run an old arcade game on a modern PC in emulation mode. “Mind uploading” has a…
  • Transhumanism has never been modern

    Richard Jones
    24 Aug 2014 | 1:08 pm
    Transhumanists are surely futurists, if they are nothing else. Excited by the latest developments in nanotechnology, robotics and computer science, they fearlessly look ahead, projecting consequences from technology that are more transformative, more far-reaching, than the pedestrian imaginations of the mainstream. And yet, their ideas, their motivations, do not come from nowhere. They have deep roots, perhaps surprising roots, and following those intellectual trails can give us some important insights into the nature of transhumanism now. From antecedents in the views of the early 20th…
  • Rebuilding the UK’s innovation economy

    Richard Jones
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:22 am
    The UK’s innovation system is currently under-performing; the amount of resource devoted to private sector R&D has been too low compared to competitors for many years, and the situation shows no sign of improving. My last post discussed the changes in the UK economy that have led us to this situation, which contributes to the deep-seated problems of the UK economy of very poor productivity performance and persistent current account deficits. What can we do to improve things? Here I suggest three steps. 1. Stop making things worse. Firstly, we should recognise the damage that has been…
  • Business R&D is the weak link in the UK’s innovation system

    Richard Jones
    24 Jun 2014 | 5:23 am
    What’s wrong with the UK’s innovation system is not that we don’t have a strong science base, or even that there isn’t the will to connect the science base to the companies and entrepreneurs who might want to use its outputs. The problem is that our economy isn’t assigning enough resource to pulling through the fruits of the science base into technological innovations, the innovation that will create new products and services, bring economic growth, and help solve some of the biggest social problems we face. The primary symptom of the problem is the UK’s very poor…
  • Surely there’s more to science than money?

    Richard Jones
    15 Jun 2014 | 12:37 pm
    How can we justify spending taxpayers’ money on science when there is so much pressure to cut public spending, and so many other popular things to spend the money on, like the National Health Service? People close to the policy-making process tend to stress that if you want to persuade HM Treasury of the need to fund science, there’s only one argument they will listen to – that science spending will lead to more economic growth. Yet the economic instrumentalism of this argument grates for many people. Surely it must be possible to justify the elevated pursuit of knowledge in less…
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    Broader Perspective

  • Proximity Marketing: Opportunity for Rich-Attribute Conveyance

    15 Sep 2014 | 11:15 pm
    Real-time Location-based Services (RT-LBS or just RT-LS) is an important new concept in mobile marketing. These offerings are starting to tout the ability to deliver information and services based on the real-time location of a person. Some key examples are receiving a mobile phone-based notification of a restaurant offer while walking in a downtown area or a product coupon while shopping in a specific grocery aisle. (Although there would need to be a saturation algorithm adjustment as potential customers flock to a location.) As is true generally with the advent of newtech, there is a much…
  • Top 5 Killer Apps: QS-Automotive Sensors

    7 Sep 2014 | 10:39 pm
    The Internet of Things means not just that computing devices have connectivity to the cloud but that they are connected to each other, and therefore that novel applications can be developed in this rich ecosystem. One area for development is linking quantified self wearable sensors with automotive sensors for applications including Fatigue Detection, Real-time Parking and Assistance, Anger/Stress Reduction, Keyless Authentication, and DIY Diagnostics.The auto industry may be poised for tremendous change in the next two decades with self-driving cars, denser cities, more cars on the road, and…
  • Cognitive Nanorobots for Pathology Resoulution and Enhancement

    2 Sep 2014 | 12:30 am
    One way to think of cognitive nanorobots is as a subset of medical nanorobots, meaning nanorobots for use in the body related to medical purposes, in this case, neural processes. Nanorobots are tiny computing machines at the nanoscale that can perform a variety of operations within the human body and beyond. In the strictest sense, nanorobots are still conceptual: the Oxford English Dictionary definition of nanorobots (nanobots) is hypothetical very small (nanoscale) self-propelled machines, especially ones that have some degree of autonomy and can reproduce. While this definition that…
  • Complexity Science: Does Autocatalysis Explain the Emergence of Organizations?

    25 Aug 2014 | 10:32 pm
    One of the newer complexity science books is The Emergence of Organizations and Markets by John F. Padgett and Walter W. Powell (2012). At first glance, the book might seem like just another contemporarily-popular social network analysis dressed up in complexity language. The book presents the claim that chemistry concept autocatalysis is the explanatory model for the emergence and growth of organizations. The argument is that autocatalysis (the catalysis of a reaction by one of its products) is like the process of individuals acquiring skills which thereby transform products and…
  • Intracortical Recording Devices

    18 Aug 2014 | 11:22 pm
    A key future use of neural electrode technology envisioned for nanomedicine and cognitive enhancement is intracortical recording devices that would capture the output signals of multiple neurons that are related to a given activity, for example signals associated with movement, or the intent of movement. Intracortical recording devices will require the next-generation of more robust and sophisticated neural interfaces combined with advanced signal processing, and algorithms to properly translate spontaneous neural action potentials into command signals [1]. Capturing, recording, and…
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    Overcoming Bias

  • Great Filter TEDx

    Robin Hanson
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:35 pm
    This Saturday I’ll speak on the great filter at TEDx Limassol in Cyprus. Though I first wrote about the subject in 1996, this is actually the first time I’ve been invited to speak on it. It only took 19 years. I’ll post links here to slides and video when available.
  • Did Industry Cause Nations?

    Robin Hanson
    14 Sep 2014 | 4:45 pm
    An interesting claim: the nation-state didn’t exist before, and was caused by, the industrial revolution. Oh there were empires before, but most people didn’t identify much with empires, or see empires as much influencing their lives. In contrast people identify with nation-states, which they see as greatly influencing their lives. More: Before the late 18th century there were no real nation states. … If you travelled across Europe, no one asked for your passport at borders; neither passports nor borders as we know them existed. People had ethnic and cultural identities, but these…
  • Tarot Counselors

    Robin Hanson
    13 Sep 2014 | 1:55 am
    [Tarot card] readers claim to be able to describe a person’s life, his problems, hopes and fears, his personality and even his future. (more) I recently watched a demonstration of Tarot card reading. The reader threw out various interpretations of the cards she placed, in terms of the subjects personality and life, and watched the subject carefully for reactions, moving the interpretation closer to options where the subject seemed more engaged. Though the subject was a skeptic, she admitted to finding the experience quite compelling. Contrast such life readings to school career…
  • Do Economists Care?

    Robin Hanson
    2 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Art Carden: Heavy traffic is a problem every economist in the world knows how to solve: price road access, and charge high prices during rush hour. With technologies like E-ZPass and mobile apps, it’s easier than ever. That we don’t pick this low-hanging fruit is a pretty serious indictment of public policy. If we can’t address what is literally a principles-level textbook example of a negative spillover with a fairly easy fix, what hope do we have for effective public policy on other margins? (more) Yes! If economists actually cared about influencing real policy, they…
  • Open Thread

    Robin Hanson
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:50 am
    This is our monthly place to discuss relevant topics that have not appeared in recent posts.
 
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    The Fourth Revolution Blog

  • We Can’t Find Anybody Else In Space (and Why It Matters)

    Jeremie Averous
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:30 am
    Although loosely related to the Fourth Revolution, I want to share the link to this very interesting summary of the issues around the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence, also called the Fermi Paradox – ‘Where is Everybody?’. Where is everybody? The issue is the following: we know there are zillions of other planets that should be able to support life out there (the low estimate in the article is 1 billion in our galaxy alone); that our own Earth is quite old by space standards, hence our technology probably not so advanced, so… why do we not see any sign of…
  • Why You Should Be Scared Sometimes – It Shows You Are Thinking Big Enough

    Jeremie Averous
    13 Sep 2014 | 4:30 am
    “If you’re not a little afraid, and the other vendor in the room is telling you you shouldn’t be, then either ‘one of us is in the wrong room’ or you’re not thinking big enough” – says Matt Ridings in this post, written in the context of a small company’s sales efforts. Growth will necessarily happen at the expense of fear. Matt Ridings continues - “Fear is a good thing, it’s almost universally true that ‘the larger the opportunity the larger the challenge’”. That says it all. If you’re not a little bit afraid, then maybe you are not…
  • How to Calm Down To Find the Right Response to Your Issue

    Jeremie Averous
    11 Sep 2014 | 4:30 am
    When you are panicked and stressed there is no way you can find the right way to resolve your problem. If you are calm right now, it might look a straightforward common-sense comment, but how often have you tried to find a way to resolve an issue while remaining panicky excited? Stressed? Right now, calm down before reacting the wrong way! That will only result in one phenomenon: you will REACT instead of RESPOND. There is a definite nuance between the two. Reaction is like a knee-jerk; it is unconscious and aims for selfish short-term protection. Response on the other hand is thoughtful,…
  • Why Clarity Comes From Doing, Not Thinking

    Jeremie Averous
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:30 am
    “Clarity comes from engagement, not thought”. I am not quite sure whom to attribute that quote but it has become very much used on the internet (Marie Forleo seems to be a possible contender). Anyway, that is just a way to re-iterate that instead of over-thinking and over-intellectualizing it is quite more effective to go into action and find clarity there, in the midst of action and doing. That might require to survive to many iterations, to overcome dead-ends, and to survive to fundamental re-inventions of oneself. It’ll be tough but at least you’ll make significant…
  • The Exponential Deception, or Why We Always Underestimate Incremental Change

    Jeremie Averous
    6 Sep 2014 | 4:30 am
    I am always impressed how much we tend to underestimate the power of incremental change, i.e. the power of regular, small changes that do aggregate finally in an exponential improvement. Micro-SD card capacity multiplied by 1,000 in 10 years… that’s only an improvement by a factor of 2 every year! There are many such examples in the world around us, such as the Moore law for computer processors, or similar laws for the evolution of the memory capability of hard disks or solid-state memory. The capacity of these products do not evolve suddenly through the sudden invention of new…
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    Singularitarian

  • MIT's Robot Cheetah Can Run and Jump as Quietly as a Ninja

    16 Sep 2014 | 1:37 pm
    MIT's Robot Cheetah Can Run and Jump as Quietly as a Ninja: Robots are more mobile than ever. You’ve got Boston Dynamics’ horse-like bot, which is being field tested by the military. There’s also this Japanese robot that can do flips on the go. But compared to MIT’s Cheetah robot, those agile bots are almost nothing if not noisy heaps of metal.
  • Ethical robot research

    15 Sep 2014 | 11:02 am
    Ethical robot research
  • Like Sassy Teenagers, Atoms Talk Back

    12 Sep 2014 | 3:27 pm
    Like Sassy Teenagers, Atoms Talk Back: If you talk to an artificial atom, it turns out the atom will say something back to you. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to hear it.
  • The Case For Intelligent Failure To Invent The Future

    3 Sep 2014 | 11:53 am
    The Case For Intelligent Failure To Invent The Future: The world is changing at an increasingly rapid pace. In the past, experts with spreadsheets and econometric models or social scientists with subscale studies and linear models may have been useful. These so-called experts extrapolated from what came before, but as the rate of change has increased, looking to the past often is no longer meaningful – especially in a world driven by new technology.
  • Nanotechnology used to create next-generation holograms for information storage

    2 Sep 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Nanotechnology used to create next-generation holograms for information storage: Holograms made of tiny particles of silver could double the amount of information that can be stored in digital optical devices, such as sensors, displays and medical imaging devices.
 
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    Thought Infection

  • Real Growth from Virtual Economies – Part II: The Rise of the Virtual Economies

    @ThoughtInfected
    13 Sep 2014 | 11:42 am
    It seems that the idea that that growth in automation and algorithmization could lead to massive joblessness is becoming a popular topic lately. I highly recommend CGPGrey’s recent video on the topic (found here). While I generally agree that this represents a real problem for the near future of real economies, I have also been thinking lately that there may be some merit to one of the retorts that consistently comes up in the discussion; namely, the idea that in the future people will be doing jobs that haven’t yet been invented. Although I am certainly not sure that we will…
  • Real Growth from Virtual Economies – Part I: The VR Boom

    @ThoughtInfected
    24 Aug 2014 | 11:02 am
    Apologies for the long summer break this year, I am hoping to return to regular posts of 1-2 per month starting now. I have also been working on putting together an e-book with most of the ThoughtInfection posts from the last year and a couple of all new essays that will only be found in the ebook. I am hoping to release some time this fall – please stay tuned for that. This is part 1 of a series on the coming boom in Virtual Reality Economies which I have titled Real Growth From Virtual Economies. In this post, I will make the case that a major boom in the proliferation and adoption…
  • Corporations are not people, but soon they could be.

    andrea2z
    3 Aug 2014 | 1:24 pm
    There has been a fair amount of talk lately about the nature of corporate personhood and the destructive effects it can have on the political process. The WolfPAC, a political action organization which is (somewhat ironically) collecting money in order to lobby governments to create limits for the amount of money that can be donated to political causes. I agree that there exists a desperate need for some kind of counterbalance for the undue influence that money has on the political process, but I also recognize that this is a complex issue. In particular I am concerned that the way in…
  • Lay-Offs Should be Good News

    @ThoughtInfected
    20 Jul 2014 | 10:19 am
    I would like to preface this post by pointing out that I very much sympathize with those who must endure the stress, uncertainty and general hardship that unemployment brings upon people and families that must live through it. The purpose of this post is not meant to suggest that the human costs of job loss are negligible or unimportant, but instead to encourage deeper thought on the too often forgotten pluses of job cuts. If we wish to live in an efficient and fair society then we must seek means to maximize the pros and diminish the cons of eliminating jobs. …
  • The Speech – Part 5 of Isaac’s Escape

    @ThoughtInfected
    8 Jun 2014 | 4:25 am
    This is a work in progress for the next part of Isaac’s Escape. Go here for the first, second, third, and fourth parts. ———————————- “We stand at a turning point in history.” The man (or at least the projection of a man) stood above the crowd gathered at the steps of the congress. He was sharply dressed, but not too sharply. He was wearing a loose fitting business which produced that newly fashionable wrinkled look. The suit gave the man a slight impression of innocence, like a boy arriving for his first…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Getting Through High School

  • Just Some Sunshine for the Monday Blues

    15 Sep 2014 | 12:35 pm
    I decided to break away from the usual routine today and just post some stories that tickled me when I read them. I understand that some of them might be old, but they still make me laugh! I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.Wrong email address:A couple going on vacation but his wife was on a business trip so he went to the destination first and his wife would meet him the next day.When he reached his hotel, he decided to send his wife a quick email.Unfortunately, when typing her address, he mistyped a letter and his note was directed instead to an elderly preacher’s wife whose husband…
  • Why I Think Blogging is Great

    12 Sep 2014 | 11:00 am
    Hi everyone! I know I've been spotty with posting this last week, but I promise, we're gonna be back on the ball! I felt like dedicating this post to blogging! You might ask yourself "well, how the heck does blogging relate to school?" Here's my answer: this is not some step-by-step how-to for school.This blog is whatever you and I make it to be! I write this stuff for your benefit and for my own, because it gives me a hobby and you, hopefully, something interesting to read! Wow, I'm using a lot of exclamation marks. Anyway, I think that blogging is a great way to say what you wanna say and…
  • Slow and Steady Might Not Win This Race

    8 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    In today's world, everything is fast and instant. We have Instant Noodles and Fast Passes and the like. Nothing is ever slowed down anymore. While some people might criticize this (ex: "when I was your age..."), it can actually be beneficial if you can keep up. I'm not necessarily promoting short attention spans and instant gratification, but I am promoting keeping up to speed. No one wants to get left in the dust.That's where speed reading comes in. I actually don't know if it's speed-reading or speed reading, but we'll just use the latter here. Anyway, we all pretty much need to speed read…
  • Great Math Help!

    3 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Hey guys! I've probably already mentioned this, but if you ever need math help, visit www.khanacademy.com. They have helpful, instructional videos for you. Don't forget, I also do private tutoring if you ever want personalized help! I can guarantee that I cost less than an average tutor. Check out my Tutoring page!
  • They're Not There Yet With Their Grammar

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Unfortunately, there will be people who will argue with me about the grammar of the title of this post. Sadly, that means that they don't understand basic grammar rules. If you are secretly one of those people that don;t know when to use or how to use certain words, don't worry, I've got your back!Before I start talking about grammar and all that good stuff, I'd like to address one thing. Obviously, I don't use correct grammar all the time on this blog, and you might be thinking "well, this guy can't write properly; why should I listen to him?" The answer: I try to make this blog as friendly…
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