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  • Lewis Dartnell at The Interval: How to Rebuild Our World From Scratch on March 24 02015

    Blog of the Long Now
    Mikl Em
    21 Mar 2015 | 12:18 pm
    Tuesday, March 24, 02015 Lewis Dartnell (University of Leicester / European Space Agency) The Knowledge: Rebuilding Our World From Scratch at The Interval Tickets on sale now advanced tickets suggested This Tuesday in San Francisco Long Now welcomes British astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell to our Conversations at The Interval series to discuss his latest book The Knowledge. This book is a guide to rebuilding key features of civilization like agriculture, communication, transportation and medicine in the aftermath of a global catastrophe. The Knowledge will be on sale at the talk, and Lewis will…
  • A nanolaser and a bendable-light material promise to speed up microelectronic devices

    KurzweilAI » News
    27 Mar 2015 | 8:43 pm
    The ultra-thin semiconductor stretches across the top of the photonic cavity (credit: University of Washington) University of Washington (UW) scientists have built a new nanometer-sized laser — using the thinnest semiconductor available today — that is energy efficient, easy to build, and compatible with existing electronics. The UW nanolaser, developed in collaboration with Stanford University, uses a tungsten-based semiconductor only three atoms thick as light emitter. The technology is described in a paper published in the March 16 online edition of Nature. Nanolasers —…
  • Big Think and Singularity University Study Reveals2015 Exponential Leaders

    Singularity University
    Megan North
    5 Mar 2015 | 12:34 pm
    U.S. Executive Study Examines Disruptive Innovation New York – March 5, 2015 – Big Think, the online video network where the world’s leading thinkers examine the most essential ideas of our age, and Singularity University (SU), a education and business accelerator, today announced the results of the 2015 Disruptive Innovation Survey. Big Think and Singularity University partnered to conduct this first-ever study into the traits of exponential leadership to fully understand the impact of exponential technology on global business. The survey was developed from and informed by Salim…
  • Usefully Wrong

    Open the Future
    Jamais Cascio
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:31 pm
    It's a line I've used quite a bit in my talks: "The point of futurism [foresight, scenarios] isn't to make accurate predictions. We know that in details large and small, our forecasts will usually be wrong. The goal is to be usefully wrong." I'm not just pre-apologizing for my own errors (although I do hope that it leaves people less annoyed by them). I'm trying to get at a larger point -- forecasts and futurism can still be powerful tools even without being 100% on-target. Forecasts, especially of the multiple-future scenario style, force you (the reader or recipient of said futurism) to…
  • US Air Force and Navy designing FA-XX sixth generation fighter jets to replace F22 and F 18 E/F

    Next Big Future
    28 Mar 2015 | 1:26 am
    The Navy and the Air Force could team up for their early look into their next crop of fighters (FA-XX program) due out in 2030, the Navy’s director of air warfare told USNI News.In 2016, the US Navy and US air force are in a position to set out on a joint analysis of alternatives (AoA) for the follow on to Navy’s Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and the Air Force’s Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor air superiority fighter, said Rear Adm. Mike Manazir.As part of the Fiscal Year 2016 budget, the Navy has set aside $5 million to start the F/A-XX work — planned to replace the Super Hornets in the…
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    Blog of the Long Now

  • Lewis Dartnell at The Interval: How to Rebuild Our World From Scratch on March 24 02015

    Mikl Em
    21 Mar 2015 | 12:18 pm
    Tuesday, March 24, 02015 Lewis Dartnell (University of Leicester / European Space Agency) The Knowledge: Rebuilding Our World From Scratch at The Interval Tickets on sale now advanced tickets suggested This Tuesday in San Francisco Long Now welcomes British astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell to our Conversations at The Interval series to discuss his latest book The Knowledge. This book is a guide to rebuilding key features of civilization like agriculture, communication, transportation and medicine in the aftermath of a global catastrophe. The Knowledge will be on sale at the talk, and Lewis will…
  • Michael Shermer Seminar Tickets

    Andrew Warner
    18 Mar 2015 | 3:51 pm
    The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking Michael Shermer presents “The Long Arc of Moral Progress” TICKETS Tuesday April 14, 02015 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15 About this Seminar: Steven Pinker writes: “Shermer has engaged the full mantle of moral progress and considered how far we have come and how much farther that arc can be bent toward truth, justice, and freedom.” “Through copious data and compelling examples Shermer shows how the arc of the moral universe, seen from a…
  • Warren Buffett maintains his lead in his $1 million Long Bet

    Andrew Warner
    13 Mar 2015 | 3:44 pm
    In 02008, Warren Buffett placed a Long Bet that will take until 02017 to resolve. He predicted that for those ten years, “the S & P 500 will outperform a portfolio of funds of hedge funds, when performance is measured on a basis net of fees, costs and expenses.” Below is a summary of how things went in the seventh year of this Bet, as published by Fortune Magazine: Warren Buffett adds to his lead in $1 million hedge-fund bet By Carol Loomis Seven years into a 10-year performance wager, the Berkshire Hathaway CEO is winning easily. Results are in for the seventh year of what’s…
  • Long Now at Cal Academy Nightlife

    Andrew Warner
    12 Mar 2015 | 5:40 pm
    On Thursday, March 19, 02015, Long Now will be participating in the California Academy of Sciences Nightlife event. The theme for the evening is “Time Capsule”, and Long Now executive director Alexander Rose will be giving a short talk in the African Hall. Long Now will also have a table with various artifacts from our projects that usually live behind glass. The Nightlife series is an opportunity for adults to explore the California Academy of Sciences in the evening with cocktails, music, and themes that feature collaborations with local organizations. The event goes from 6pm to 10pm,…
  • Paul Saffo Seminar Tickets

    Andrew Warner
    9 Mar 2015 | 2:07 pm
      The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking Paul Saffo presents “The Creator Economy” TICKETS Tuesday March 31, 02015 at 7:30pm Cowell Theater at Fort Mason Long Now Members can reserve 1 seat, and purchase additional tickets at half-price. Join today! General Tickets $15   About this Seminar: According to futurist (and Long Now board member) Paul Saffo, the ‘new economy” anticipated in the late 01990s is arriving late and in utterly unexpected ways. Social media, maker culture, the proliferation of sensors, and even the 02008 market crash…
 
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • A nanolaser and a bendable-light material promise to speed up microelectronic devices

    27 Mar 2015 | 8:43 pm
    The ultra-thin semiconductor stretches across the top of the photonic cavity (credit: University of Washington) University of Washington (UW) scientists have built a new nanometer-sized laser — using the thinnest semiconductor available today — that is energy efficient, easy to build, and compatible with existing electronics. The UW nanolaser, developed in collaboration with Stanford University, uses a tungsten-based semiconductor only three atoms thick as light emitter. The technology is described in a paper published in the March 16 online edition of Nature. Nanolasers —…
  • Engineers create stretchable structures tougher than bulletproof vests

    27 Mar 2015 | 3:58 pm
    SEM micrographs of a coil fabricated from aligned nanofibers (credit: (credit: Mahmoud Baniasadi et al./ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces) Researchers at University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) have created a material made from nanofibers that can stretch to up to seven times its length while remaining tougher than Kevlar. These structures absorb up to 98 joules per gram. Kevlar, often used to make bulletproof vests, can absorb up to 80 joules per gram. The researchers hope the structures will one day form material that can reinforce itself at points of high stress and could potentially…
  • Photosynthesis hack needed to feed the world by 2050

    27 Mar 2015 | 2:58 pm
    Pipeline of transformation of leaf discs of tobacco (easily transformed and forms a closed canopy) with constructs for improved photosynthetic efficiency through regeneration on selective media, growth of the initial transformants to seed, and then testing of transgenes in replicated field plots (credit: Stephen P. Long et al./Cell) High-performance computing and genetic engineering could boost crop photosynthetic efficiency enough to feed a planet expected to have 9.5 billion people on it by 2050, researchers report in an open-access paper in the journal Cell. “We now know every step in…
  • New kind of ‘tandem’ solar cell developed

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:26 pm
    Test sample of a monolithic perovskite-silicon multijunction solar cell produced by the MIT-Stanford University team (credit: Felice Frankel) Researchers at MIT and Stanford University have developed a new kind of solar cell that combines two different layers of sunlight-absorbing material to harvest a broader range of the sun’s energy. The development could lead to photovoltaic cells that are more efficient than those currently used in solar-power installations, the researchers say. The new cell uses a layer of silicon — which forms the basis for most of today’s solar panels…
  • Promising pathways for solar photovoltaic power

    26 Mar 2015 | 8:05 pm
    Illustration shows the MIT team’s proposed scheme for comparing different photovoltaic materials, based on the complexity of their basic molecular structure. The complexity increases from the simplest material, pure silicon (single atom, lower left), to the most complex material currently being studied for potential solar cells, quantum dots (molecular structure at top right). Materials shown in between include gallium aresenide, perovskite and dye-sensitized solar cells. (credit: MIT) In a broad new assessment of the status and prospects of solar photovoltaic technology, MIT researchers…
 
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    Open the Future

  • Usefully Wrong

    Jamais Cascio
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:31 pm
    It's a line I've used quite a bit in my talks: "The point of futurism [foresight, scenarios] isn't to make accurate predictions. We know that in details large and small, our forecasts will usually be wrong. The goal is to be usefully wrong." I'm not just pre-apologizing for my own errors (although I do hope that it leaves people less annoyed by them). I'm trying to get at a larger point -- forecasts and futurism can still be powerful tools even without being 100% on-target. Forecasts, especially of the multiple-future scenario style, force you (the reader or recipient of said futurism) to…
  • Not Very Uplifting

    Jamais Cascio
    1 Dec 2014 | 12:58 pm
    What responsibility do we have for the things we make? At its root, this is a fairly straightforward science story. Neuroscience researchers at the University of Rochester and the University of Copenhagen successfully transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) into a newborn mouse (here's the technical article in The Journal of Neuroscience, and the lay-friendly version in New Scientist). While glial cells are generally considered a support cell in the brain, positioning, feeding, insulating, and protecting neurons, they also help neurons make synaptic connections. The hGPCs…
  • The Inevitable Future

    Jamais Cascio
    10 Nov 2014 | 2:11 pm
    Film student Taylor Baldschun invited me to participate in a project of his, a short documentary on the end of humanity. His final (for the moment) version can be seen here: The Inevitable Future from Taylor Baldschun on Vimeo. On my first viewing, I started counting off the various mannerisms and habits that I find annoying in my own speaking style. But I was caught off-guard by my own final statement, which Taylor uses to close the movie. If humanity were to go extinct, obviously, our life goes away. Over time, our artifacts go away. So what really would be lost in that existential sense is…
  • Magna Cortica talk at TEDx Marin

    Jamais Cascio
    4 Nov 2014 | 6:23 am
    (brushes away cobwebs, wipes dust off of screen, sits quietly for a moment and wonders what happened...) The video of my TEDx talk on the ethics of cognitive augmentation is now up, and you can view it at the TEDx Marin website. (It's also on YouTube directly, but for the time being I'm doing as asked and pointing people to the TEDx Marin website.) A few notes: Most importantly: This talk is based on the work I did for the Institute for the Future's 2014 Ten-Year Forecast. Of all of the things I would like to change about this talk, calling this out explicitly is at the top of the list. I…
  • Berlin Videos

    Jamais Cascio
    9 Sep 2014 | 12:19 pm
    The Climate Engineering Conference 2014 in Berlin has uploaded the videos of all plenary sessions, available here. (http://www.ce-conference.org/conference-videos) The Berlin Museum talk I posted below can be listened to here: Climate Engineering and the Meaning of Nature (Jamais Cascio) (I had just finished writing the talk -- I scripted it to stay within a very strict time limit -- so I spend more time than I should looking down. Better to listen to than to watch, I think.) My brief digression on the nature of futurism in the context of thinking about the environment (a last bit of the last…
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    Next Big Future

  • US Air Force and Navy designing FA-XX sixth generation fighter jets to replace F22 and F 18 E/F

    28 Mar 2015 | 1:26 am
    The Navy and the Air Force could team up for their early look into their next crop of fighters (FA-XX program) due out in 2030, the Navy’s director of air warfare told USNI News.In 2016, the US Navy and US air force are in a position to set out on a joint analysis of alternatives (AoA) for the follow on to Navy’s Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and the Air Force’s Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor air superiority fighter, said Rear Adm. Mike Manazir.As part of the Fiscal Year 2016 budget, the Navy has set aside $5 million to start the F/A-XX work — planned to replace the Super Hornets in the…
  • China News Roundup - x-ghost cities, over 13 million unregistered ghost children, booming mobile commerce and US bungled policy

    28 Mar 2015 | 1:02 am
    Nextbigfuture will be bundling news that relates to China or India to make articles on these topic less frequent and easier to skip for those not interested in this topic. We will still have standalone articles on China and India where appropriate. Here we hae four topic related to China. 1. The dominant angle on China's ghost cities is that four decades of overzealous growth is starting to catch up with China. China is accused of irresponsible development. The so-called ghost cities are shown as irrefutable evidence of an imminent economic meltdown. But when a Chinese “ghost city”…
  • Will Saudi Arabia get a nuclear bomb ?

    27 Mar 2015 | 5:19 pm
    There are reports that Pakistan would sell nuclear weapons to Saudi Arabia, if the United States succeeded in negotiating an Iranian nuclear deal. The US and Iran may be preparing to sign an agreement at the end of March.The UK Independent states that western intelligence agencies believe that the Saudi monarchy paid for up to 60% of Pakistan’s nuclear programme in return for the ability to buy warheads for itself at short notice, the Guardian newspaper reported in 2010.Eurasia Review says that it is ridiculous to believe that Pakistan would sell Saudi Arabia the bomb. Muhammad Umar case at…
  • Saudi Arabia invades Yemen with 150,000 soldiers, 100 fighter jets and 76 fighters from partners

    27 Mar 2015 | 9:40 am
    Saudi Arabia on Wednesday night launched airstrikes against Iranian-backed Shiite rebel forces in Yemen, responding to distress calls from the U.S.-backed Yemeni president who was fleeing the country in the face of relentless advances by the rebels.The intervention brings the risk that Yemen will become ground zero for a proxy war pitting Saudi Arabia and other Sunni Arab states against Iran, the region’s largest Shiite power, and signals a marked escalation of complexity in the evolving war gripping several nations across the Middle East.Saudi Arabia deployed 100 fighter jets, 150,000…
  • Boeing patents temporary plasma forcefields that will reduce shockwaves from explosions

    27 Mar 2015 | 2:04 am
    Boeing has a patent for temporary "forcefields" against shockwaves. The blast shockwave would be attenuated by creating a plasma. An arc generator may be configured to generate a focused microwave beam or a focused laser beam. The focused beam rapidly heats the air in the selected region and changes its temperature, density and composition, the latter the result of the creation of free electrons. The arc generator may be adapted to create a conducting path for the electric current. Accordingly, the arc generator may be configured to generate one or more of a laser-induced plasma…
 
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    the Foresight Institute

  • Automated synthesis expands nanotechnology building block repertoire

    Jim Lewis
    24 Mar 2015 | 3:42 pm
    A machine in University of Illinois chemistry professor Martin Burke's lab assembles complex small molecules out of simple chemical building blocks, like a 3-D printer on the molecular level. Credit: University of Illinois. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer High-throughput atomically precise manufacturing (APM) has been described as a manufacturing technology that could be developed over the next few decades that could radically change civilization (Radical Abundance). APM has been alternatively referred to as “molecular nanotechnology”, “molecular manufacturing” and…
  • Targeted nanoparticles deliver molecules to resolve atherosclerotic inflammation

    Jim Lewis
    9 Mar 2015 | 7:48 pm
    Schematic of a targeted nanoparticle with a hydrophilic polymer shell containing targeting ligands and a hydrophobic polymer core containing therapeutic cargo. Credit: Harvard Medical School and Science Translational Medicine. Our most recent posts (here and here) focused on increasing acceptance of the idea that the ultimate future of nanotechnology rests with high throughput atomically precise manufacturing. This one exemplifies the use of atomically precise elements from biotechnology and chemistry incorporated into non-atomically precise but increasingly sophisticated nanostructures to…
  • Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

    Jim Lewis
    8 Mar 2015 | 5:35 pm
    Screenshot of DNA nanorobot designed using cadnano. Credit: Nature Nanotechnology. Continuing the theme of our previous post, is the idea of atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology accruing credibility in the blogosphere? Over at Gizmodo Jamie Condliffe asks “What Will the Future of Molecular Manufacturing Really Be Like?“: Molecular machines are nano-scale assemblers that construct themselves and their surroundings into ever more complex structures. Sometimes dubbed “nanotech” in the media, these devices are promising — but also widely…
  • Are nanorobots and atomically precise manufacturing becoming mainstream nanotechnology?

    Jim Lewis
    7 Mar 2015 | 1:50 pm
    Two months ago we noted renewed interest in the prospects of atomically precise manufacturing originating from outside the community of those usually interested in advanced nanotechnology. The writer we cited gave an excellent overview of the prospects based on Eric Drexler’s Radical Abundance: How a Revolution in Nanotechnology Will Change Civilization, published in 2013, and on Productive Nanosystems: A Technology Roadmap, published by Battelle Memorial Institute and the Foresight Institute in 2007. Three more articles appeared the past few weeks. Foresight President Paul Melnyk…
  • Small, fast, electrically-driven nanomotors

    Jim Lewis
    5 Mar 2015 | 10:13 am
    Credit: University of Texas at Austin In a post here a number of years ago then-Foresight President J. Storrs Hall commented on the power density that nanomotors based on advanced nanotechnology are expected to have—on the order of a megawatt in a cubic millimeter. How is current research in nanomotors progressing? Last year Phys.Org reprinted this University of Texas at Austin news release “Engineers Build World’s Smallest, Fastest Nanomotor“: Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have built the smallest, fastest and…
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    Soft Machines

  • Does radical innovation best get done by big firms or little ones?

    Richard Jones
    5 Mar 2015 | 12:56 am
    A recent blogpost by the economist Diane Coyle quoted JK Galbraith as saying in 1952: “The modern industry of a few large firms is an excellent instrument for inducing technical change. It is admirably equipped for financing technical development and for putting it into use. The competition of the competitive world, by contrast, almost completely precludes technical development.” Coyle describes this as “complete nonsense” -“ big firms tend to do incremental innovation, while radical innovation tends to come from small entrants.” This is certainly conventional wisdom…
  • Growth, technological innovation, and the British productivity crisis

    Richard Jones
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:38 pm
    The biggest current issue in the UK’s economic situation is the continuing slump in productivity. It’s this poor productivity performance that underlies slow or no real wage growth, and that also contributes to disappointing government revenues and consequent slow progress reducing the government deficit. Yet the causes of this poor productivity performance are barely discussed, let alone understood. In the long-term, productivity growth is associated with innovation and technological progress – have we stopped being able to innovate? The ONS has recently released a set of…
  • Science, Politics, and the Haldane Principle

    Richard Jones
    5 Jan 2015 | 1:09 pm
    The UK government published a new Science and Innovation Strategy just before Christmas, in circumstances that have led to a certain amount of comment (see, for example, here and here). There’s a lot to be said about this strategy, but here I want to discuss just one aspect – the document’s extended references to the Haldane Principle. This principle is widely believed to define, in UK science policy, a certain separation between politics and science, taking detailed decisions about what science to fund out of the hands of politicians and entrusting them to experts in the Research…
  • Responsible innovation and irresponsible stagnation

    Richard Jones
    16 Nov 2014 | 12:05 pm
    This long blogpost is based on a lecture I gave at UCL a couple of weeks ago, for which you can download the overheads here. It’s a bit of a rough cut but I wanted to write it down while it was fresh in my mind. People talk about innovation now in two, contradictory, ways. The prevailing view is that innovation is accelerating. In everyday life, the speed with which our electronic gadgets become outdated seems to provide supporting evidence for this view, which, taken to the extreme, leads to the view of Kurzweil and his followers that we are approaching a technological singularity.
  • What the UK government should do about science and innovation

    Richard Jones
    12 Nov 2014 | 3:59 am
    I have a new post up at the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute’s blog – Rebuilding the UK’s innovation economy. It’s a more tightly edited version of my earlier post on Soft Machines with the same title.
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    The Technium

  • Sourced Quotes, 21

    Kevin Kelly
    15 Mar 2015 | 3:52 pm
    Some people call VR “the last medium” because any subsequent medium can be invented inside of VR, using software alone. Looking back, the movie and TV screens we use today will be seen as an intermediate step between the invention of electricity and the invention of VR. Kids will think it’s funny that their ancestors used to stare at glowing rectangles hoping to suspend disbelief. — Chris Dixon, Virtual Reality, cdixon Blog, January 24, 2015 I’ve developed over time a simple rule. I will only hire someone to work directly for me if I would work for that person. And…
  • AI, or Alien Intelligence

    Kevin Kelly
    24 Jan 2015 | 3:10 pm
    This year, 2014, John Brockman’s annual question was “What Do You Think About Machines That Think?”. My answer is that I think we could call them artificial aliens. I’m reposting my full response here: The most important thing about making machines that can think is that they will think different. Because of a quirk in our evolutionary history, we are cruising as the only sentient species on our planet, leaving us with the incorrect idea that human intelligence is singular. It is not. Our intelligence is a society of intelligences, and this suite occupies only a small…
  • Sourced Quotes, 20

    Kevin Kelly
    21 Jan 2015 | 11:14 am
    Image Change has never happened this fast before, and it will never be this slow again. Graeme Wood Social Principal #9, Geek Media, Sept 29, 2009 Even the primeval Stone Age islanders of the Sentinelese, who still persist in 2015 and shoot everybody who tries to talk to them with cane bows, are under satellite surveillance. The Indian Navy rigorously protects them from any knowledge of the Indian Navy.– Bruce Sterling, State of the World 2015, January 5, 2015 Never assume that something you find utterly creepy today will not be the norm tomorrow. — Jan Chipchase, Four Deep…
  • How to Use Artificial Intelligence

    Kevin Kelly
    4 Nov 2014 | 11:20 am
    About a year ago I started writing a piece on AI for Wired. I turned it in last spring, and they just published it this month. They also cut it in half. Still, the piece retains my essential points about AI: 1) We should really call it Artificial Smartness, because we don’t want it conscious. 2) It will be a cloud service; you’ll buy as much IQ as you need on demand. 3) There will only be 2-3 major AI providers since AI will follow network effects. I also talk about the 3 breakthroughs that make AI finally happen now. You can read more at Wired. The decorative images Wired used to…
  • A Desirable-Future Haiku

    cc
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:38 pm
    The coming hundred years, in one hundred words Recently I sent a twitter request out into the wider internets. I got 23 responses, which I am running (with permission) below. I’ll tell you who I selected as the winner in a moment, but first I’d like to tell you what I learned. It’s a hard assignment. Compressing anything as messy as the future into 100 words is a near-impossible challenge. Almost like writing poetry. And 100 years is so immensely distant from us that we need to fictionalize it. But the most difficult part is imagining a scenario that is desirable. This exercise began…
 
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    Sentient Developments

  • A.I. Pilots Are Not The Solution To Preventing Airline Disasters

    George
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:02 pm
    We're still trying to understand the horrific Germanwings tragedy. But already, some people are suggesting it could have been prevented if a computer had been flying the plane. But that's not the solution. We spoke to an expert about why an A.I. pilot would open up an entirely new set of risks and complications.Read the entire article at io9.
  • This Biohacker Used Eyedrops To Give Himself Temporary Night Vision

    George
    27 Mar 2015 | 12:00 pm
    A team of biohackers from California successfully induced a temporary sense of night vision by injecting a simple chemical cocktail directly onto the eye. Incredibly, it allowed them to see over 160 feet in the dark for a brief period of time.Read the entire post at io9.
  • This New Infrared Telescope Could Help Us Detect Dyson Spheres

    George
    26 Mar 2015 | 10:50 am
    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence just got a big boost, thanks to the introduction of a powerful new infrared telescope. In addition to scanning for pulses of infrared light, astronomers will use device to search for alien megastructures, such as Dyson Spheres.Read the entire article at io9.
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    Broader Perspective

  • Immanence Reputations of Intelligent Instances running on Smartnetworks

    22 Mar 2015 | 9:37 pm
    One vision of the future is digital societies, comprised of different forms of intelligence like blockchain AIs, smart-contract DACs, and human mindfile uploads all running on smartnetworks. Verification of such digital identities may well be required for smartnetwork access. We are already living in a prototype of this world now, in the sense that access to digital properties requires digital identity verification. Many websites invite logging in with Facebook or Twitter as an already-established digital identity heuristic. Also in the contemporary world, we are currently constrained to an…
  • Cogntive Enhancement can Integrate Man and Machine

    15 Mar 2015 | 11:37 pm
    Cognitive enhancement should be conceived as the philosophical issue of the greater subjectivation possibilities for man, as opposed to primarily a bioethical concern. The current world is one in which man and technology are increasingly interlinked. One high-stakes endeavor is cognitive enhancement, of which there are different working definitions. A precise account is that cognitive enhancement is the augmentation of human skills, attributes, and competencies through the use of technology, medicine, and therapy designed to increase human performance capability (Hildt). Another is that it is…
  • Blockchain Thinkers and Smart Contracts to take over the World?

    8 Mar 2015 | 11:16 pm
    Automatically-executing smart contracts and their impact on society has been contemplated in many different contemporary science fiction works like Daemon (Suarez), and Accelerando and Glasshouse (Stross). The interesting point is that artificial autonomous agents are becoming increasingly full-fledged participants in the real-life contemporary world. There are many forms of artificial intelligence in development, and also the advent of new kinds of information technology like blockchains. Blockchains could be an explosive operational venue for new kinds of autonomous agents like distributed…
  • New Legal Regime for Blockchain-based Smart Property and Smart Contracts?

    1 Mar 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Beyond the already wide-ranging digital currency and financial transaction applications for blockchain technology, there is another class of applications that could allow a complete reconfiguration of law and government. Blockchains are a new form of decentralized information technology, the trustless cryptographic public ledger system that underlies digital currencies like Bitcoin. Some of these potential application in law and government are that in the future, all property (hard and soft assets, and intellectual property) could be registered and transacted via blockchains as smart…
  • Top 5 Immediate Money-Making Applications of Blockchain Technology

    22 Feb 2015 | 11:43 am
    The right question is not whether Bitcoin is over or under-valued, or over or under-hyped, but what the biggest potential money-making applications might be. While we wait for consumer-ready cryptocurrency applications to be presented to us by the financial services industry and other trusted providers, in the progression of ATMs, online billpay, eStatements, and Apple Pay, there are many other opportunities to be explored. Blockchains could be the last piece of core infrastructural technology needed to facilitate the machine learning revolution in the same progression as the industrial…
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    Overcoming Bias

  • Bowing To Elites

    Robin Hanson
    23 Mar 2015 | 10:55 am
    Imagine that that you are a politically savvy forager in a band of size thirty, or a politically savvy farmer near a village of size thousand. You have some big decisions to make, including who to put in various roles, such as son-in-law, co-hunter, employer, renter, cobbler, or healer. Many people may see your choices. How should you decide? Well first you meet potential candidates in person and see how much you intuitively respect them, get along with them, and can agree on relative status. It isn’t enough for you to have seen their handiwork, you want to make an ally out of these…
  • Dissing Track Records

    Robin Hanson
    20 Mar 2015 | 6:25 am
    Years ago I was being surprised to learn that patients usually can’t pick docs based on track records of previous patient outcomes. Because, people say, that would invade privacy and make bad incentives for docs picking patients. They suggest instead relying on personal impressions, wait times, “bedside” manner, and prestige of doc med school or hospital. (Yeah, those couldn’t possibly make bad incentives.) Few ever study if such cues correlate with patient outcomes, and we actively prevent the collection of patient satisfaction track records. For lawyers, most trials are in the…
  • Ford’s Rise of Robots

    Robin Hanson
    15 Mar 2015 | 2:25 pm
    In the April issue of Reason magazine I review Martin Ford’s new book Rise of the Robots: Basically, Ford sees a robotic catastrophe coming soon because he sees disturbing signs of the times: inequality, job loss, and so many impressive demos. It’s as if he can feel it in his bones: Dark things are coming! We know robots will eventually take most jobs, so this must be now. … [But] In the end, it seems that Martin Ford’s main issue really is that he dislikes the increase in inequality and wants more taxes to fund a basic income guarantee. All that stuff about robots is…
  • The Data We Need

    Robin Hanson
    15 Mar 2015 | 7:45 am
    Almost all research into human behavior focuses on particular behaviors. (Yes, not extremely particular, but also not extremely general.) For example, an academic journal article might focus on professional licensing of dentists, incentive contracts for teachers, how Walmart changes small towns, whether diabetes patients take their medicine, how much we spend on xmas presents, or if there are fewer modern wars between democracies. Academics become experts in such particular areas. After people have read many articles on many particular kinds of human behavior, they often express opinions…
  • Life Before Earth

    Robin Hanson
    13 Mar 2015 | 8:45 am
    This paper is two years old now, but still seems big news to me: Genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides … Linear regression of genetic complexity (on a log scale) extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life = 9.7 ± 2.5 billion years ago. … There was no intelligent life in our universe at the time of the origin of Earth, because the universe was 8 billion years old at that time, whereas the development of intelligent life requires ca. 10 billion years of evolution. (source; discussion; HT Stuart…
 
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    The Speculist

  • A New Way to Distribute Books

    Phil Bowermaster
    13 Mar 2015 | 12:14 pm
    An alternative way of distributing a book: rather than going through the normal distribution channels, just give some away. Ask the recipients, if they don’t find the book to their liking, to please pass it on to someone whom they think would like it. And ask them if they do like it to consider purchasing a copy to give to someone else. In fact, encourage them to give away one to three copies, depending on how much they liked the book. If the book is well-liked, it will go viral. If it is not it will fizzle out almost immediately. This is a test-case for the Gift Economy, albeit an…
  • Old Body, New Parts

    Phil Bowermaster
    12 Mar 2015 | 12:03 pm
    Researchers and practitioners are making dramatic progress in producing usable human tissues via (highly modified) 3D printers. Although we aren’t there yet, eventually we can expect to see whole kidneys, livers, hearts, and lungs produced in vats or via printer-like devices. These will be a godsend for patients who otherwise would be looking for an organ transplant (no danger of rejection when it’s your own organ.) And down the road, people might start swapping out organs just as part of a maintenance program. If young blood can make you more youthful, what might a whole new heart do?
  • Distributed Autonomous Businesses

    Phil Bowermaster
    11 Mar 2015 | 11:50 am
    One of the models for associating individual wealth with productive output in an economy  that is predominantly (if not completely) post-labor is to apportion ownership of companies across the population. This could be a matter of distributing shares of existing companies or granting shares or exclusive ownership to new companies. The ideal fit would be with self-starting startups. As a dedicated AI system (or many such systems) launch profitable companies, their ownership is distributed throughout the population according to whatever criteria make the most sense. It could be random or tied…
  • Movies Starring You

    Phil Bowermaster
    10 Mar 2015 | 11:44 am
    The technology already pretty much exists to recreate classic movies with a computer-generated version of you replacing the star. This could be extended to include your whole family or circle of friends. (Do It’s a Wonderful Life for Christmas for example.) Or you could leave some of the original actors in place,  depending on who you want to swap classic lines with, share a steamy love scene with, etc. Studios will soon have to start licensing these one-off versions of movies, as well as one-off games based on them or face losing to pirates who will do so anyway. But then if you can put…
  • Alternative Versions of You

    Phil Bowermaster
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:55 pm
    In the future we will be able to interact with virtual versions of celebrities, historical figures, and fictional characters. Of course, these virtual people will be sophisticated software programs designed to approximate what their characters are / were / would be like. A useful variation might be to have a chat with virtual alternate versions of yourself. What if I hadn’t taken that job? What if we had gotten married? What if I had majored in business? Sit down and talk it over with a virtual version of you who took the road not taken. The projected alternative won’t be in any sense…
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

  • Future US Navy: Robotic sub-hunters, deepsea pods

    28 Mar 2015 | 2:40 am
    The robotic revolution that transformed warfare in the skies will soon extend to the deep sea, with underwater spy "satellites," drone-launching pods on the ocean floor and unmanned ships hunting submarines.
  • Mexico sets greenhouse gas target for UN climate talks

    28 Mar 2015 | 2:23 am
    Mexico became Friday the first developing nation to submit targets for UN climate change talks in December, pledging that its greenhouse gas emissions will peak in 2026 before falling.
  • Microsoft buys Office collaborator app LiveLoop

    28 Mar 2015 | 2:19 am
    Microsoft said Friday it has purchased the office mobile app LiveLoop, which allows multiple users to collaborate on PowerPoint presentations simultaneously.
  • Europe resumes Galileo satnav deployment (Update)

    27 Mar 2015 | 3:15 pm
    Europe resumed deployment of its beleaguered Galileo satnav programme on Friday, launching a pair of satellites seven months after a rocket malfunction sent two multi-million euro orbiters awry.
  • Festo has BionicANTs communicating by the rules for tasks

    27 Mar 2015 | 3:10 pm
    Germany-based automation company Festo, focused on technologies for tasks, turns to nature for inspiration, trying to take the cues from how nature performs tasks so efficiently. "Whether it's energy efficiency, lightweight construction or function integration – over time, nature has developed a wealth of optimization strategies for adapting to its environment, and these strategies can be applied to the world of engineering," a Festo sentiment shared by many engineers outside of Festo.
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    The Fourth Revolution Blog

  • How the Implementation of Holacracy Appears Challenging

    Jeremie Averous
    26 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    As we reported in a post about one year ago, a significant holacracy experiment is going on at Zappos. Lately reports have not been so favorable about the experiment as for example this Quartz post ‘Holacracy at Zappos: It’s either the future of management or a social experiment gone awry’. Basically employees have no more title, they have temporary positions and they need to operate more like entrepreneurs on an internal market (quite contrary, by the way, to the traditional theory of the firm that states that companies are there because they minimize the cost of internal…
  • Why ‘Embedded Consulting’ Delivers Better Results for Enterprise Transformation

    Jeremie Averous
    24 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    As consultant I have seen two extremes when it comes to consulting interventions regarding enterprise transformation: The ‘embedded consulting’ with one or two ‘trusted advisors’ to Senior Management, most of the work done by employees temporarily assigned to the project and a very limited number of specialized consultants focused on specific capabilities that are lacking in the organization, A large team of consultants coming in and doing most of the work , delivering finished products (typically the business model of large consulting firms). Should the consultant…
  • Why Finding Meaning in our Life Becomes Harder

    Jeremie Averous
    21 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    As the complexity and unpredictability of our world increases significantly, and has even been accelerating in the past few years, it becomes more difficult to find our life’s meaning and purpose. How can we find our way in an ever larger labyrinth? One of the reasons is the multiplication of choices that are offered to us – like excessively lengthy restaurant menus, choice kills the choice. As our freedom increases, it is naturally more difficult to fix ourselves on a single purpose. One other reason is the unpredictability and the occurrence of freak events that change…
  • How to Create Disruptive Change

    Jeremie Averous
    19 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    Following our post ‘Why Experts Are Always Wrong About the Future‘, how can we overcome the limitations of expert forecasts, and create the disruptive changes that puzzle experts? Paul Graham a famous Venture Capitalist, shares some insights in an interesting post ‘How to Be an Expert in a Changing World‘. The post is worth reading in its entirety for its insights. Paul Graham starts from the same position as us: “Change that matters usually comes from an unforeseen quarter. So I don’t even try to predict it“. And he continues, “we are full of…
  • Why Experts Are Always Wrong About the Future

    Jeremie Averous
    17 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    I am always puzzled about the failure of experts to predict anything. Take for example the sudden drop of oil price: most experts agreed one year ago that high prices were here to stay (and increase further); and the same experts now explain with the same smile and assurance that they see prices go down even more as they already halved in 6 months time. How come they can change their mind so quickly (and without shame it seems!)? A random oil price forecast of 2011. How come the current price is lower than the lowest? The reason is of course simple. Experts are experts on an earlier version…
 
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    Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra

  • Reading Edge of Dark – on living with robots

    Glen Hiemstra
    24 Mar 2015 | 3:19 pm
    I’m half way into an excellent new science fiction book, Edge of Dark, by Brenda Cooper, who is also a Futurist.com Think Tank expert. This is Brenda’s 8th novel and the first in a two-part series. From the Amazon book description… What if a society banished its worst nightmare to the far edge of the solar system, destined to sip only dregs of light and struggle for the barest living. And yet, that life thrived? It grew and learned and became far more than you ever expected, and it wanted to return to the sun. What if it didn’t share your moral compass in any way? The…
  • Georgetown Texas going renewable

    Glen Hiemstra
    20 Mar 2015 | 11:20 am
    This is pretty impressive news out of Georgetown, Texas, a community of 54000 people north of Austin, Texas. They have announced a plan for the city to become the first in Texas to be powered entirely by renewable energy – not in some distant decade, but by the end of 2016. Working with Solar power company SunEdison, and wind developer EDF, Georgetown will obtain 150 megawatts of solar energy and enough from a 194 megawatt wind farm to break the tie to fossil fuels for electricity. The driving force – it is going to be cheaper. Check out the story of how Georgetown Texas is going…
  • Why driverless cars instead of driver-assist

    Glen Hiemstra
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:34 pm
    The head of Google’s self driving car program explains what is up. I was able to hear him this week at TED, and will update more of his remarks later. But he was pretty convincing that ultimately creating a true driverless or fully autonomous vehicle makes more sense than a driver assisted vehicle. What is interesting about the video below is the story of how they are trying to invent the autonomous vehicle from the ground up, rather than as a retro-fit (which we’ve seen on the streets for some time). Bottom line is that I think this whole tech could be closer than we normally…
  • Plan needed for California Drought

    Glen Hiemstra
    14 Mar 2015 | 9:55 am
    Lake McClure CA, Feb. 4, 2015The LA Times reports that the ongoing drought in California has left the state’s reservoirs with just a one-year supply of water, according to NASA. January was the driest in California since record keeping began. So far, says the Times opinion piece, the state response consists mostly of some conservation measures and hoping for rain. There is no firm plan for what do do if the drought turns into a 20-year mega-drought. Four steps are recommended: 1. Mandatory water rationing state-wide. 2. Speed the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management…
  • Driverless Cars

    Glen Hiemstra
    13 Mar 2015 | 5:18 pm
    There is little doubt that autonomous, or driverless cars are on the way. I used to think it was a decade out, or more. But given the work that various companies are doing – most car companies as far as I know – it seems likely that a 5-year window from now is not too long. Certainly by then at least a degree of autonomy, perhaps a driverless option on highways and freeways, will be probable. The latest visual splash is the Mercedes seen driving around San Francisco recently. Prediction: the public acceptance of a driverless car will exceed expectations. Here is the Mercedes in…
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    XYZ University

  • The World’s Aging Workforce and What Your Business Should Do About It

    Sarah Sladek
    19 Mar 2015 | 5:09 am
      XYZ University publishes Scary Stats each Halloween, and this latest stat just might be the scariest of 2015: Despite projected growth in the global population from 6.9 billion to 7.6 billion in 2020, the working-age population is expected to decline. In fact, aging will likely add 360 million older people (Baby Boomers) to the world’s pool of those not participating in the labor force. There are few exceptions to this aging trend. India’s workforce is getting younger with one-third of the country’s population under the age of 15. Other developing market economies with young…
  • Rookie Talent: Avoiding a Kodak Moment

    Sarah Sladek
    7 Jan 2015 | 2:07 am
    During most of the 20th century Kodak held a dominant position in photographic film, and in 1976, had an 89% market share of photographic film sales in the United States. Kodak began to struggle financially in the late 1990s as a result of the decline in sales of photographic film and its slowness in transitioning to digital photography. In 2012, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The Kodak name became synonymous with a resistance to change, but it’s not just innovation the company lacked. In 2011, Kodak made the list of Top 10 Fortune 500 Employers With Older Workers,…
  • What would Scrooge do?: Planning for workforce future

    Sarah Sladek
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:35 pm
    Tis the season for the celebration of one year’s end and another year’s beginning. Amidst all the champagne and time spent with family and friends, I encourage you to ponder the future–but perhaps a little differently than usual. Most of us are familiar with the famous story by Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. In the story, a miser named Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by three ghosts: Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Future. Scrooge finds the third ghost the most fearsome, and the ghost’s warnings about his future transform him from…
  • Culture and the Bottom Line: Why burritos are outperforming the S&P 500

    Sarah Sladek
    8 Dec 2014 | 6:51 am
    You can’t put a price on culture. Or can you? Danny Meyer is a renowned New York City restauranteur and the CEO and founder of Union Square Hospitality Group. He believes success in any business is based on culture. In 2009 Meyer appeared on Jim Cramer’s show Mad Money. On the show, Cramer’s producers surprised him by wheeling out a tray featuring food from various public restaurant companies: a lobster from Red Lobster, a bowl of spaghetti from the Olive Garden, a Big Mac from McDonalds, a steak from Ruth’s Chris Steak House, and a burrito from Chipotle. Cameras are on Meyer and…
  • Want to ace the interview? Strategies for Gen Y job-seekers

    Sarah Sladek
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:40 pm
    Did you know? One of the biggest complaints employers have about Generation Y (1982-1995) is that they’re not prepared for interviews, and many employers consider hiring Gen Ys a risk because they leave their jobs faster than other generations and they are difficult to manage. Prove that you’re a return on investment. Share a past work experience during the interview to help the employer understand how hiring you will bring the company more value than your salary. Bring a business card and samples of your work to the interview. Get a good reference – a knowledgeable expert with many…
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    Singularitarian

  • An Exoskeleton That Acts Like a Wearable Chair

    25 Mar 2015 | 11:53 am
    An Exoskeleton That Acts Like a Wearable Chair: Standing is great for your health—Burn calories! Live longer! Tone those calves!—but only if you’re not forced to do it for hours on end. As with sitting on your bum, everything is best in moderation.
  • Scientists Successfully Insert Woolly Mammoth DNA Into Elephant Genome

    24 Mar 2015 | 12:30 pm
    Scientists Successfully Insert Woolly Mammoth DNA Into Elephant Genome: In true “Jurassic Park” style, scientists at Harvard University have successfully managed to insert genes from the woolly mammoth into the genome of an elephant. While this may represent significant progress in the field, lead researcher George Church has reportedly played down claims that the work brings us closer to recreating these iconic animals.
  • New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

    20 Mar 2015 | 2:30 pm
    New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function: Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques - structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.
  • A fully transparent solar cell that could make every window and screen a power source

    20 Mar 2015 | 9:52 am
    A fully transparent solar cell that could make every window and screen a power source: Researchers at Michigan State University have created a fully transparent solar concentrator, which could turn any window or sheet of glass (like your smartphone’s screen) into a photovoltaic solar cell. Unlike other “transparent” solar cells that we’ve reported on in the past, this one really is transparent, as you can see in the photos throughout this story. According to Richard Lunt, who led the research, the team are confident that the transparent solar panels can be efficiently deployed in a…
  • Scientists discover how to change human leukemia cells into harmless immune cells

    18 Mar 2015 | 12:30 pm
    Scientists discover how to change human leukemia cells into harmless immune cells: Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that when a certain aggressive leukemia is causing havoc in the body, the solution may be to force the cancer cells to grow up and behave.
 
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    Jeff Kramer

  • SXSW Interactive 2015 Wrap-Up

    Jeff Kramer
    20 Mar 2015 | 2:58 pm
    Spring break has come and gone in Austin, which means that we’re recovering from another amazing SXSW Interactive festival. This year for me was a year of narrative story technologies and Community.  For the last several years I’ve been going to SXSW with my wife, Irma, and this year she had her own session.  That meant she spent a lot of time in the women in tech tracks, and we didn’t see each other as much as usual.  It’ll be interesting to read her write up, when she gets to it. Friday – Al, Tim, BBQ, Old Friends, & 3D Printed Clothes Friday…
  • Machines That Tell Stories: SXSW 2015

    Jeff Kramer
    18 Mar 2015 | 12:51 pm
    Last Saturday at SXSW Interactive Jon Lebkowsky and I curated a Core Conversation titled Machines That Tell Stories. I proposed the topic as a book project to Jon last year, and we put together this discussion as a stepping stone. Software storytellers are in the air. There were over a dozen sessions at SXSW this year on storytelling systems, and that kind of consensus usually heralds a new wave about to break. We’ve setup a twitter and tumblr for this project, if you want to follow along. Our argument: Software is moving beyond raw data and into narrative.  First it will help you…
  • Games That Play Themselves

    Jeff Kramer
    19 Feb 2015 | 10:36 am
    A few days ago a new iOS app called Dreeps landed in my news feed, heralded with headlines like Maybe The Laziest RPG You Could Ever Play and A Video Game That Plays Itself. Dreeps is an app where a little robot boy goes on an adventure, Japanese RPG style.  You set an alarm to tell him to rest, and that’s it.  When the alarm goes off, he gets up and gets on with his adventure, fighting monsters and meeting NPCs.  There’s pixel art and chiptune audio.  Dialog is word balloons with squiggly lines for text.  It’s all very atmospheric.  You just don’t do…
  • Data Day Texas 2015 Recap

    Jeff Kramer
    12 Jan 2015 | 7:51 pm
    Saturday was Data Day Texas (twitter), a single day conference covering a variety of big data topics up at the University of Texas’s conference center.  I went in my HP Helion big data guy role, and my wife Irma went as a python developer and PyLadies ATX organizer.  I’ve written up some notes on the conference for those interested and unable to attend.  As far as I know, there weren’t any recordings made, so this may be more useful than some other more archived conferences. The conference was held at the University of Texas’s Conference Center.  It’s a…
  • SXSW 2014: The One About Privacy

    Jeff Kramer
    21 Mar 2014 | 9:12 am
    Two weekends ago SXSW Interactive graced our fair city, and as usual, I was there and even spoke a little.  Thankfully my house wasn’t robbed this time. This year’s SXSW Interactive was heavy on privacy, internet security, and wresting our freedom back.  There weren’t keynotes from social players aiming to get you to join their thing, instead it was Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, and Neil DeGrasse Tyson telling you to learn and think for yourself.  It’s a refreshing change, and I’m eager to see what the tone of next year will be. SXSW started really going on…
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    Thought Infection

  • Could Wireless Power be Weaponized?

    @ThoughtInfected
    28 Feb 2015 | 4:03 am
    Sorry for the lack of posts lately. Still working on the upcoming Thought Infection ebook as well as a really thought provoking next post for the Decentralization and Future World order series. For now just a short thought about a possible scary application for an emerging technology, weaponized focusing of wireless power. ———————————– Some of you may have heard about Steve Perlman’s startup which is pursuing the use of computed constructive interference of radio waves to greatly increase signal strength and…
  • Decentralization and the Future World Order – Part II: Trust is Power

    @ThoughtInfected
    8 Feb 2015 | 5:50 am
    This is the second in a multi-part series (part 1 here) on what I predict will be one of the most important technological trends of 2015, the decentralization revolution. By creating a way for the transfer of value to be performed over a trustless distributed network Bitcoin has already changed the world but Bitcoin is only the tip of the decentralization iceberg. ———————– What is power? Physics gives us a simple definition of power as a measure of the rate of doing work. For example, when you turn on your microwave a certain…
  • Decentralization and the Future World Order – Part I: The Revolution Is On

    @ThoughtInfected
    24 Jan 2015 | 2:17 am
    This will be the first in a multi-part series on what I predict will be one of the most important technological trends of 2015, the decentralization revolution. By creating a way for the transfer of value to be performed over a trustless distributed network Bitcoin has already changed the world but Bitcoin is only the tip of the decentralization iceberg.  —————————— A technological revolution is underway. An array of technologies are being developed that aim to do nothing less than disrupt the deepest fabric of the current…
  • Summoned – Part 6 of Isaac’s Escape

    @ThoughtInfected
    30 Nov 2014 | 5:15 am
    This is a work in progress for the next part of Isaac’s Escape. Go here for part 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 ——– “He wants to physically meet with me?” Isaac was incredulous. This was the third time he asked the same question. Noah Marks was a notoriously recluse man, and the idea that he should want to have a face-to-biological-face interaction with Isaac was difficult to comprehend. “Yes, a car is already waiting for you” said the BioMark agent as he motioned towards a non-descript black car sitting at the curb in front of them.
  • A Lack of Human Intelligence is Still a Much Larger Threat Than Artificial Intelligence

    @ThoughtInfected
    16 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Elon Musk made headlines recently when, in an interview at the MIT Aerospace Symposium, he stated that he believed that the development of artificial intelligence (AI) is likely the biggest existential threat to humanity; he went as far as to compare the development of AI with the summoning of a demon. Musk is concerned enough about the rapid development of AI systems that he has also put some financial power behind his words, investing in some AI start-ups so he can keep a close eye on progress in the field. While I am reluctant to disagree with the visionary behind three high-tech…
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    Getting Through High School

  • The Balancing Act (Part I)

    25 Mar 2015 | 11:00 am
    If you don't know, my life is pretty busy. I'm not telling you this to brag because, honestly, I'd rather sit and do nothing. Unfortunately, there's no benefit in that so I have do my best to combat my instincts for a greater goal. What is that greater goal? Most likely success. I'm not entirely sure. I mean, it makes sense, right? I think I'll go with that then. I overcome my natural urge to sloth about because I want to be successful in life and obviously that won't happen if I'm at home watching Parks and Recreation all day.Just to let you have a peek into my…
  • Getting Back Into The Groove

    23 Mar 2015 | 12:00 pm
    So I kind of went a whole quarter without posting anything for you all, and its mostly because I've just had little time for myself. But this quarter will be different! It's the last quarter of school and we're in the home stretch. So let's just get right into it! I hope you guys enjoy the next couple of posts!!
  • 5 Things You Can Do To Become More Organized For School

    3 Feb 2015 | 1:35 pm
    Let's face it, unless you're super compulsive, you're gonna be disorganized to some degree. I like to consider myself organized, but one peek into the drawer under my bed will tell you a different story. Before I sound too hypocritical for giving you organization advice, I'd like to point out that I will organize that space. One day. Hopefully.Anyway, organization is basically one of the most important things in our lives. Without organization, our lives would be a mess, literally. Perhaps your stove might be in the bathroom. Your bed might be in the living room. Heck, maybe your food would…
  • How Do You Know?

    21 Jan 2015 | 12:38 pm
    So recently I had a good ole fashioned debate with some of my classmates. We've started this new class in school called Theory of Knowledge, which should sound familiar to IB kids. Anyway, the main principles of the class revolve around two basic questions: what do you know? and how do you know what you know is true? Naturally, us being the know-it-all teens we all can be, we started questioning everything someone said and waited for them to defend their statements. We would then claim, from our own positions of "rightness," that that person's claim was either inaccurate or accurate. Of…
  • Did You Forget to Have Fun Again???

    16 Jan 2015 | 11:30 am
    I know, I know. Now that we're in high school, we're so bogged down that our minds forget the meaning of "fun." But that is no excuse! I think that the most important part of high school (besides finishing) is having fun. You want to look back on your high school years and think "Wow, those were some good times." So if you'll allow to me forget about homework and that other "necessary" stuff, I just might mention some things that I know of that are fun.I've already mentioned that you need to enjoy yourself throughout high school. Why? Not only is it good for your mind, but it is also good for…
 
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