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  • Long Now’s Nevada and Artists with Lasers: January 02015 at The Interval

    Blog of the Long Now
    Mikl Em
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:21 pm
    We have just announced our lineup of upcoming events at The Interval for 02015. The first four months of the year will feature talks on art, science, history, technology and long-term thinking. Tickets are on sale now for the first two: January 6, 02015 Scotty Strachan: The Great Basin in the Anthropocene environmental researcher at University Nevada-Reno Scotty will talk about his scientific research in the Great Basin region including the Long Now owned site on Mount Washington in Nevada January 20, 02015 Mathieu Victor: Artists with Lasers artist, technology consultant (formerly of Jeff…
  • It might be possible to restore lost memories

    KurzweilAI » News
    21 Dec 2014 | 11:17 pm
    Synapse (credit: Curtis Neveu/Wikimedia Commons) New UCLA research indicates that lost memories can be restored, offering hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. For decades, most neuroscientists have believed that memories are stored at the synapses — the connections between brain cells, or neurons — which are destroyed by Alzheimer’s disease. The new study provides evidence contradicting the idea that long-term memory is stored at synapses. “Long-term memory is not stored at the synapse,” said David Glanzman, a senior author of the study, and a UCLA…
  • Exponential Finance, Jun 2-3

    Singularity University
    Megan North
    12 Dec 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Singularity University is partnering with CNBC to bring you Exponential Finance, a two day conference that brings together the world’s top leaders in technology and finance at the Lincoln Center in NYC. Learn how technology will transform every industry, creating existential threats to your business, your client base, your investors and your portfolio. Learn more and apply here: http://exponential.singularityu.org/finance
  • Not Very Uplifting

    Open the Future
    Jamais Cascio
    1 Dec 2014 | 12:58 pm
    What responsibility do we have for the things we make? At its root, this is a fairly straightforward science story. Neuroscience researchers at the University of Rochester and the University of Copenhagen successfully transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) into a newborn mouse (here's the technical article in The Journal of Neuroscience, and the lay-friendly version in New Scientist). While glial cells are generally considered a support cell in the brain, positioning, feeding, insulating, and protecting neurons, they also help neurons make synaptic connections. The hGPCs…
  • Nextbigfuture will change discussion system and UI tonight

    Next Big Future
    21 Dec 2014 | 11:27 pm
    Nextbigfuture will be changing its discussion system and UI tonight.Hopefully this will done with minimal disruption.A new logo will also be implemented in a few days.Read more »
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    Blog of the Long Now

  • Long Now’s Nevada and Artists with Lasers: January 02015 at The Interval

    Mikl Em
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:21 pm
    We have just announced our lineup of upcoming events at The Interval for 02015. The first four months of the year will feature talks on art, science, history, technology and long-term thinking. Tickets are on sale now for the first two: January 6, 02015 Scotty Strachan: The Great Basin in the Anthropocene environmental researcher at University Nevada-Reno Scotty will talk about his scientific research in the Great Basin region including the Long Now owned site on Mount Washington in Nevada January 20, 02015 Mathieu Victor: Artists with Lasers artist, technology consultant (formerly of Jeff…
  • Jesse Ausubel Seminar Tickets

    Andrew Warner
    17 Dec 2014 | 6:20 pm
      The Long Now Foundation’s monthly Seminars About Long-term Thinking Jesse Ausubel presents “Nature is Rebounding: Land- and Ocean-sparing through Concentrating Human Activities” TICKETS Tuesday January 13, 02015 at 7:30pm SFJAZZ Center Long Now Members can reserve 2 seats, join today! General Tickets $15   About this Seminar: Jesse Ausubel is an environmental scientist and program manager of a number of global biodiversity and ecology research programs. Ausubel serves as Director and Senior Research Associate of the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller…
  • Ferreting the Genome

    Perry Hall
    16 Dec 2014 | 3:44 pm
    Revive & Restore Unveils Open Genomics for Conservation Initiative Revive & Restore is embarking on its first open-access science initiative – Ferreting the Genome: Open Genomics for Conservation. The initiative will enlist the help of the public to understand how the black-footed ferret gene pool has changed from the founding population to the current generation. The goal is to determine, through this understanding, how genetic rescue techniques might be applied to conserve the species. The black-footed ferret is a model species for this research; information from this initiative…
  • “Wanderers” Short Film Gives Glimpse of Our Possible Future in Space

    Andrew Warner
    11 Dec 2014 | 3:33 pm
    “Wanderers“, a short film by director Erik Wernquist, depicts a not-so-far future in which humanity has expanded throughout the solar system. The film starts with a panorama of humans 10,000 years ago at the dawn of civilization, a key point of reference in Long Now’s own intellectual ecosystem. There are two specific aspects that set the video apart: the carefully researched hard science behind each shot of the video and the generally optimistic depiction of the future. To make the video, director Erik Wernquist made composite shots from images from different space missions…
  • Brian Eno and Danny Hillis: The Long Now, now — a Seminar Flashback

    Mikl Em
    9 Dec 2014 | 9:35 am
    photos by Kelly Ida Scope In January 02014 Brian Eno and Danny Hillis, co-founders of The Long Now Foundation, spoke about The Long Now, now in our Seminars About Long-term Thinking series. Long Now’s third co-founder, Stewart Brand, joined them onstage for the second part of the talk. Leaving the planet, singing, religion, drugs, sex, and parenting are all touched on in their wide-ranging and humor-filled discussion. There’s much about the 10,000 Year Clock project, of course, including details about how The Clock’s chime generator will work. And, fittingly, they…
 
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    KurzweilAI » News

  • It might be possible to restore lost memories

    21 Dec 2014 | 11:17 pm
    Synapse (credit: Curtis Neveu/Wikimedia Commons) New UCLA research indicates that lost memories can be restored, offering hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. For decades, most neuroscientists have believed that memories are stored at the synapses — the connections between brain cells, or neurons — which are destroyed by Alzheimer’s disease. The new study provides evidence contradicting the idea that long-term memory is stored at synapses. “Long-term memory is not stored at the synapse,” said David Glanzman, a senior author of the study, and a UCLA…
  • An affordable holodeck for civil engineers

    21 Dec 2014 | 7:14 pm
    VuePod (credit: BYU) Brigham Young University (BYU) student civil engineers have constructed an affordable 3D immersive visualization system from commercial off-the-shelf components and open-source software. The “VuePod” system uses 12 high-definition, 55-inch 3D televisions all connected to a computer capable of supporting high-end, graphics-intensive visualization.  Images are controlled by a Wii remote that interacts with a Kinect-like  3D tracking device called SMARTTRACK. 3D glasses worn by the user create the added dimension. The VuePod allows users to virtually fly over,…
  • Could ibuprofen be an anti-aging medicine?

    19 Dec 2014 | 12:11 am
    Ibuprofen extends the lifespan of C. elegans worms: survival curves shown here are for worms treated with ibuprofen at a dose of 0.1 mM (red) compared to experiment-matched untreated (credit: Chong He et al./PLOS Genetics) Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter drug used to relieve pain and fever, could hold the keys to a longer healthier life, according to a study by researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging.  Publishing in PLoS Genetics (open access) December 18, scientists showed that regular doses of ibuprofen extended the lifespan of yeast, worms and fruit flies. Brian…
  • New magnetoelectric memory promises low-power, instant-on computing devices

    18 Dec 2014 | 11:40 pm
    A conceptual illustration of magnetization reversal, given by the compasses, with an electric field (blue) applied across the gold capacitors. The compass needles under the electric field are rotated 180 degrees from those not under the field (0 degrees rotated). The two-step switching sequence described in the paper is represented by the blurred compass needle under the electric field, making an intermediate state between the 0 and 180-degree rotated states. (Credit: John Heron) A team led by postdoctoral associate John Heron of Cornell University has developed a room-temperature…
  • Deep neural network rivals primate brain in object recognition

    18 Dec 2014 | 9:23 pm
    Example images from three of the seven image categories used to measure object category recognition performance by neural networks and monkeys (credit: Cadieu et al./ PLoS Comput Biol) A new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that for the first time, one of the latest generation of “deep neural networks” matches the ability of the primate brain to recognize objects during a brief glance. Because these neural networks were designed based on neuroscientists’ current understanding of how the brain performs object recognition, the success of the latest networks suggests that…
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    Singularity University

  • Exponential Finance, Jun 2-3

    Megan North
    12 Dec 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Singularity University is partnering with CNBC to bring you Exponential Finance, a two day conference that brings together the world’s top leaders in technology and finance at the Lincoln Center in NYC. Learn how technology will transform every industry, creating existential threats to your business, your client base, your investors and your portfolio. Learn more and apply here: http://exponential.singularityu.org/finance
  • Will Google Pluto Berlitz?

    admin
    4 Dec 2014 | 12:21 pm
  • What The Roads Of The Future Could Look Like

    admin
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:20 am
    …espresso maker in the centre console. Drone delivery system Matternet US company Matternet is designing a drone delivery network for regions,
  • Does rampant AI threaten humanity?

    admin
    2 Dec 2014 | 9:03 am
    …successors, is the writing on the wall for humans? Maybe, said Neil Jacobstein, AI and robotics co-chairman at California’s Singularity University.
  • Why Music: Telling the Story of Music and the Mind

    admin
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:36 pm
    there must be a better solution. I’ve just returned from the Exponential Medicine conference, where I had the privilege to present on a range of…
 
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    Open the Future

  • Not Very Uplifting

    Jamais Cascio
    1 Dec 2014 | 12:58 pm
    What responsibility do we have for the things we make? At its root, this is a fairly straightforward science story. Neuroscience researchers at the University of Rochester and the University of Copenhagen successfully transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) into a newborn mouse (here's the technical article in The Journal of Neuroscience, and the lay-friendly version in New Scientist). While glial cells are generally considered a support cell in the brain, positioning, feeding, insulating, and protecting neurons, they also help neurons make synaptic connections. The hGPCs…
  • The Inevitable Future

    Jamais Cascio
    10 Nov 2014 | 2:11 pm
    Film student Taylor Baldschun invited me to participate in a project of his, a short documentary on the end of humanity. His final (for the moment) version can be seen here: The Inevitable Future from Taylor Baldschun on Vimeo. On my first viewing, I started counting off the various mannerisms and habits that I find annoying in my own speaking style. But I was caught off-guard by my own final statement, which Taylor uses to close the movie. If humanity were to go extinct, obviously, our life goes away. Over time, our artifacts go away. So what really would be lost in that existential sense is…
  • Magna Cortica talk at TEDx Marin

    Jamais Cascio
    4 Nov 2014 | 6:23 am
    (brushes away cobwebs, wipes dust off of screen, sits quietly for a moment and wonders what happened...) The video of my TEDx talk on the ethics of cognitive augmentation is now up, and you can view it at the TEDx Marin website. (It's also on YouTube directly, but for the time being I'm doing as asked and pointing people to the TEDx Marin website.) A few notes: Most importantly: This talk is based on the work I did for the Institute for the Future's 2014 Ten-Year Forecast. Of all of the things I would like to change about this talk, calling this out explicitly is at the top of the list. I…
  • Berlin Videos

    Jamais Cascio
    9 Sep 2014 | 12:19 pm
    The Climate Engineering Conference 2014 in Berlin has uploaded the videos of all plenary sessions, available here. (http://www.ce-conference.org/conference-videos) The Berlin Museum talk I posted below can be listened to here: Climate Engineering and the Meaning of Nature (Jamais Cascio) (I had just finished writing the talk -- I scripted it to stay within a very strict time limit -- so I spend more time than I should looking down. Better to listen to than to watch, I think.) My brief digression on the nature of futurism in the context of thinking about the environment (a last bit of the last…
  • Talking About Extinction In Front of Dinosaurs

    Jamais Cascio
    25 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    I'm back from the first Climate Engineering Conference, held in Berlin. Quite a good trip, but in many ways the highlight was the talk I gave at the Berlin Natural History Museum. The gathering took place in the dinosaur room, which holds (among other treasures) the "Berlin Specimen" Archaeopteryx fossil, among the most famous and most important fossils ever discovered. The acoustics of the place, however, were terrible, so I don't know how well any recordings will turn out. Fortunately, I had to script my talk, so I can offer the full text of what I said: I’ve been doing foresight work…
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    Next Big Future

  • Nextbigfuture will change discussion system and UI tonight

    21 Dec 2014 | 11:27 pm
    Nextbigfuture will be changing its discussion system and UI tonight.Hopefully this will done with minimal disruption.A new logo will also be implemented in a few days.Read more »
  • Terminator: Genisys will be first of reboot trilogy and then rights revert to James Cameron

    21 Dec 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Paramount Pictures is amping up its rebooted “Terminator” franchise, dating two sequels to “Terminator: Genisys,” [aka Terminator 5] which opens July 1.The studio has dated “Terminator 2″ for May 19, 2017, and “Terminator 3″ on June 29, 2018.A spokeswoman for Annapurna said in 2012 that under new copyright rules, North American rights to The Terminator franchise could revert back to creator James Cameron in 2019 — 35 years after the original “Terminator” was released.James Cameron is getting writing credits for the trilogy of terminator reboots. However, it is not clear…
  • Baidu Deep Speech system 81% accurate in noisy environments compared to 65% for best commercial systems

    21 Dec 2014 | 3:48 pm
    Arxiv - DeepSpeech: Scaling up end-to-end speech recognitionBaidu researchers present a state-of-the-art speech recognition system developed using end-to-end deep learning. Our architecture is significantly simpler than traditional speech systems, which rely on laboriously engineered processing pipelines; these traditional systems also tend to perform poorly when used in noisy environments. In contrast, our system does not need hand-designed components to model background noise, reverberation, or speaker variation, but instead directly learns a function that is robust to such effects. We do…
  • Mars Curiosity Rover measures a tenfold spike in methane which could mean life on Mars

    21 Dec 2014 | 12:20 am
    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory's drill."This temporary increase in methane -- sharply up and then back down -- tells us there must be some relatively localized source," said Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, a member of the Curiosity rover science team. "There are many possible sources, biological or non-biological, such as interaction of water and…
  • Significant resources to make Mach Effect Propulsion might have spaceship propulsion within ten years

    20 Dec 2014 | 11:04 am
    Journal of Space Exploration - How Long Will It Take To Build Starships?The theme for Space Technology Applications International Forum II in 2013 was: when will it be possible to build craft capable of reaching the stars in reasonable lengths of time? “Reasonable” was understood to be significantly less than a human lifetime. That can only be done by implementing “exotic” technologies that are presently thought to be the stuff of science fiction. But there is at least one proposal may make such technologies practicable. It rests on “Mach’s principle” as Einstein called it. This…
 
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    the Foresight Institute

  • Large, open protein cages designed and built

    Jim Lewis
    7 Dec 2014 | 4:44 pm
    A molecular cage created by designing specialized protein pieces. On the left is one copy of the designed protein molecule. The 24 copies of it on the right, each colored differently, make the molecular cage. The lavender image on the right indicates the openness of the empty space in the middle of the container and is not actually part of the molecular structure. Credit: Yen-Ting Lai, Todd Yeates While some protein scientists make impressive progress designing novel protein folds, others combine natural protein oligomers in novel ways to make unexpected extreme structures not seen in nature.
  • Broadening the synthetic biology path to molecular nanotechnology

    Jim Lewis
    6 Dec 2014 | 1:49 pm
    A novel three-helix, hyper stable helical bundle in which five (5) distinct helix-helix interacting layers were designed. Credit: Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington The first journal article to call for the development of molecular manufacturing (Drexler 1981, journal publication) identified the task of designing more stable proteins as a path toward more general capabilities for molecular manipulation. Proof of principle for this goal was already apparent by 1988, and we have followed progress since then (for example, here and here). A brief comment in a recent issue of…
  • Nearly perfect carbon nanotubes key to energy-saving lights

    Jim Lewis
    2 Dec 2014 | 6:08 pm
    Planar light source device (Left-front, Right-rear) Photo Credit-N. Shimoi/Tohoku University Foresight’s recent Workshop on Directed/Programmable Matter for Energy focused on the potential of atomically precise materials for energy production, transport, and efficient use. A hat tip to Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence for describing how scientists from Tohoku University in Japan had combined carbon nanotube field emitters with a solution of indium oxide and tin oxide to produce a very efficient planar light source. From an AIP Publishing news release by Zhengzheng Zhang “Beyond…
  • Micrometer-scale structures built from DNA bricks

    Jim Lewis
    19 Nov 2014 | 5:33 pm
    Researchers have achieved 32 different-shaped crystal structures using the DNA-brick self-assembly method. Credit: Harvard's Wyss Institute The saga of using DNA bricks to build complex 3D nanostructures continues to evolve. A hat tip to ScienceDirect for reprinting this news release from Harvard’s Wyss Institute “Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream“: DNA has garnered attention for its potential as a programmable material platform that could spawn entire new and revolutionary nanodevices in computer science, microscopy, biology, and more. Researchers have been working…
  • Notes for 400 hours of Richard Feynman's Hughes Lectures

    Jim Lewis
    12 Nov 2014 | 2:55 pm
    http://www.thehugheslectures.info John Neer writes to announce that he has made available “to the public for non-commercial use” an extensive collection of notes for lectures that Richard Feynman delivered to employees of Hughes Aircraft Company from 1966 through 1971, for two hours on Monday evenings, 9 to 10 months per year. No attempt was made to record or capture Feynman’s board work for these lectures. Mr. Neer, accomplishing what would seem to have been a Herculean task, took notes as extensively as possible during Feynman’s two-hour lectures, and then spent four…
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    Ultrafuture World

  • What is the purpose of a CA certificate?

    admin
    9 Dec 2014 | 2:29 am
    In relation to online security, CA stands for certified authority and comes in the form of a signature. When a website obtains a safety certificate such as an SSL, it can be authenticated by a CA. This provides the website with a trusted certificate that is both valid and legitimate. There are a whole host of benefits associated with obtaining a CA certificate as opposed to a regular safety certificate. It is the responsibility of the certified authority that has signed the certificate to ensure that all the information given is valid and trustworthy. Depending on which type of SSL…
  • Sciencescope – The Leader in Video Measurement Systems

    admin
    1 Nov 2014 | 11:27 pm
    Sciencescope is a business founded in 1995 to keep up with the ever-growing technological advances being made in all industries. Sciencescope manufactures and develops efficient, precision video inspection systems for various industries. Starting small, like most business, they pride their business on its growth due to integrity, hard work and an understanding of what their customers need. With a commitment to quality and dedication, Sciencescope has transformed into a company that produces a complete line of inspection solutions and X-ray equipment that can accomplish a variety of roles.
  • Ten-E Medical Packaging Services – The Standard of Safety and Excellence in Medical Packaging

    admin
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:44 am
    When you visit your family physician and notice all of the precautions that are taken with rubber gloves and specially marked disposal containers, as well as all of the information that surrounds you is barely skimming the surface of all of the safety and precautionary measures that accompany the medical profession. Safe packaging of hazardous and dangerous products is critical for your safety and the well-being of sick patients who are being treated. Ten-E Packaging Services has over twenty years of experiences in the field of dangerous goods and medical packaging, as well as transporting…
  • Marketing Through Facebook

    admin
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:20 am
    Most businesses need a Facebook Boost to make sure that their marketing efforts are effective. When the business is using social media, it will find that it can bring more customers into the fold. Also, the business will be able to reach people who would not have known about the business otherwise. The Social Media Factor Most businesses that use social media pages need to make sure they have new customers coming to the page every day. Also, these customers need to be engaged in the business in some way. Sending customers to the Facebook page allows the customer a chance to read information…
  • Automotive items that are a must for any road-trip

    admin
    9 Oct 2014 | 7:41 am
    When preparing for a road trip, you must keep an open mind as to what to bring along for the ride. Depending on the destination some of these tagalong items may seem like unnecessary luxuries, while others may seem like no-brainers. Here are three of those luxuries: A bike rack Many may already have a bike rack installed on their vehicle, others may need to invest in the added accessory. A bike rack, of course with the bicycles, is a must have for many outdoor enthusiasts. Not only is a mountain bike ride a healthy alternative to most cardio exercises, it also helps explore the natural and…
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    Broader Perspective

  • Bergson, Free Will, and the Philosophy of Cognitive Enhancement

    21 Dec 2014 | 10:32 pm
    Bergson claims that free will exists. It occurs in moments when a living being experiences duration, which is tuning into the internal sense of an experience, and a freely-determined action flows from this state. His reasoning is that “if duration is heterogeneous [if we are tuned into the internal sense of experience], the relation of the psychic state to act is unique, and the act is rightly judged free.” An act is free if it flows from an internal qualitative experience. He suggests we understand this by considering an example in our lives of having made a serious decision; where even…
  • Currency Multiplicity: Social Economic Networks

    14 Dec 2014 | 7:35 pm
    Cryptocoin multiplicity is just one kind of currency multiplicity in the modern world. More broadly, we are living in an increasingly multi-currency society with all kinds of monetary and non-monetary currencies. First, there is currency multiplicity in the sense of monetary currency in that there are many different fiat currencies (USD, CNY, EUR, GBP, etc.). Second, there are many other non-fiat, non-cryptocurrencies like loyalty points and airline miles; one estimate is that there are 4,000 such altcurrencies [1]. Now there is also a multiplicity of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies like…
  • Bergson-Deleuze: Incorporating Duration into Nanocognition

    7 Dec 2014 | 7:23 pm
    French philosophers Bergson and Deleuze bring to nanocognition and machine ethics interfaces the philosophical conceptualizations of image, movement, time, perception, memory, and reality that can be considered for implementation in tools for both cognitive enhancement and subjectivation (the greater actualization of human potential).From the standpoint of an Ethics of Perception of Nanocognition, Bergson and Deleuze stress the need to see perception in itself, and machine ethics interfaces could possibly help us do this through the concept of Cinema 3: the perception-image. Having had only…
  • Dynamic Group Cognitive Coordination through Wearable Tech

    30 Nov 2014 | 9:32 pm
    A surprising ‘new functionality’ enabler of smartwatches and wearable tech is not just getting real-time alerts and notifications to a single user as the front-end of the seamless connected computing world, but group coordination. Real-time group coordination could foster a whole new class of wearable applications, for a wide range of ‘serious’ and ‘fun’ uses in both large and small groups. 35 teams presented at the Apple WatchKit Hackathon at Silicon Valley’s Hacker Dojo on Sunday November 23, 2014. Many interesting apps were shown, mostly for only a single smartwatch like…
  • Bitcoin and Science: DNA is the Original Decentralized System

    23 Nov 2014 | 6:54 pm
    What is the role (if any) of Bitcoin and blockchain technology with regard to the natural world and traditional science? One obvious link is using the blockchain as a means of improving distributed community computing projects with tracking and remuneration. BOINC, whose software runs SETI@home, has introduced Gridcoin, and [Protein]Folding@home has introduced Foldingcoin. In addition, these distributed community computing models could be extended using blockchain technology as a way to coordinate and offer supercomputing time to DIYscientists; opening up access to a scarce resource which was…
 
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    Overcoming Bias

  • Pondering Plasticity

    Robin Hanson
    19 Dec 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Tyler recently praised (cultural) anthropologists, and with good reason. I’ve learned a great deal from reading them. Yes, economists often look down on other social scientists (who often complain loudly back), and yes anthropologists are one of the most liberal academic disciplines (e.g. high Democrat to Republican ratio), while economists (including Tyler and I) are less so. But maybe Tyler and I are more broad minded than you think. Just as supply and demand is the crown jewel of econ insight, the crown jewel of anthropology insight is cultural plasticity. This is the idea that humans…
  • “Slow” Growth Is Cosmo-Fast

    Robin Hanson
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:40 am
    In my first response to Brin at Cato Unbound (and in one followup),  I agreed with him that we shouldn’t let each group decide if to yell to aliens. In my second response, I criticize Brin’s theory that the universe is silent because most alien civilizations fall into slowly-innovating “feudal” societies like those during the farmer era: We have so far had three eras of growth: forager, farmer, and industry. … In all three eras, growth was primarily caused by innovation. … A thousand doublings of the economy seems plenty to create a very advanced…
  • Me At NIPS Workshop

    Robin Hanson
    11 Dec 2014 | 6:45 am
    Tomorrow I’ll present on prediction markets and disagreement, in Montreal at the NIPS Workshop on Transactional Machine Learning and E-Commerce. A video will be available later.
  • Guess Alien Value, Chance Ratios

    Robin Hanson
    10 Dec 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Continuing the discussion about yelling to aliens at Cato Unbound, I ask: Regarding a choice to yell on purpose, there are two key relevant parameters: a value ratio, and a chance ratio. The value ratio divides the loss we would suffer if exterminated by aliens by the gain we would achieve if friendly aliens were to send us helpful info. I’d guess this ratio is at least one thousand. The probability ratio divides the chance that yelling induces an alien to send helpful info by the chance that yelling induces an alien to destroy us. I’d guess this ratio is less than one hundred. If we can…
  • Thank You GMU Econ!

    Robin Hanson
    8 Dec 2014 | 5:20 am
    Ten years ago today the GMU economics department voted to award me tenure. With that vote, I won my academic gamble. I can’t be sure what my odds reasonably were, so I can’t be sure it was a gamble worth taking. And I’m not sure tenure is overall good for the world. But I am sure that I’m very glad that I achieved tenure. Many spend part of their tenure dividend on leisure. Many spend part on continuing to gain academic prestige as they did before. Many switch to more senior roles in the academic prestige game. And some spend tenure on riskier research agendas,…
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    The Speculist

  • How Much Data?

    Phil Bowermaster
    29 Nov 2014 | 2:32 pm
    Webopedia cites IDC research showing that we — presumably meaning humanity, all of civilization — produced 2.8 zettabytes in 2012. (That’s 2.8 trillion gigabytes, for those who couldn’t remember where “zetta” falls on the scale of hugeness.) In what may be a corallary to Moore’s Law, IDC also says that the total amount of data in the world doubles every 18 months and that we will therefore be at 40 zettabytes by 2020. Meanwhile, keeping it more businessy, Gartner projects that the total amount of enterprise data worldwide will increase 650% in the…
  • An Evolutionary Approach

    Phil Bowermaster
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:35 am
    While my recent observation that Data Is Eating Us may have come off as tongue-in-cheek, the reality behind it is no joke. Most people aren’t (yet) transforming their basic bodily functions in order to have more time to analyze data, but there is no question that the fundamental dynamic between human beings and data is changing rapidly. Writing at Forbes, Teradata’s Oliver Ratzesberger explains why: Most computational neuroscientists estimate that the human brain’s storage capacity is somewhere between 10 and 100 terabytes. Compare that to a worldwide data explosion – already…
  • The (Shrinking) Growing Data Footprint

    Phil Bowermaster
    22 Nov 2014 | 11:14 am
    At the recent SAP Teched && decode in Berlin (and, no — for those unfamiliar, there are no typos in my presentation of the event’s name) Bernd Leukert, a member of the executive board of SAP SE Products and Innovation, led a keynote session touching on several of the themes I have been writing about here recently. Using as a guide Nicholas Negroponte’s vision as outlined in his book Being Digital (1996), Leukert makes the case that we are, indeed, in transition “from a world made out of stuff to a world made out of data…and stuff” — to quote my recent…
  • Data Is Eating Us

    Phil Bowermaster
    15 Nov 2014 | 6:10 am
    Is analyzing big data more fun than eating? Well, it might just be. For some, at least. Anyway, that is one of the premises of Platfora’s recent Soylent giveaway promotion. For those who need catching up: Platfora is a Hadoop-native big data analytics platform. Soylent is an instant meal replacement, designed to provide 100% of the body’s nutritional requirements while doing away with all that distracting and time-consuming “eating” that humans are compelled to keep doing. Where these two meet is in the lives of busy data scientists and hard-core analysts. As the…
  • Datafication in Three Easy Steps

    Phil Bowermaster
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:48 pm
    The relentless wave of change that is transforming our world from being one made primarily out of stuff to one made primarily out of data has a name. It’s called datafication. Over the past few decades, we have witnessed the datafication of business, of society, and of everyday life. There appear to be three major phases of datafication. In the first phase, an activity or process becomes increasingly reliant on data. In the second, data begins to transform the activity or process by taking a central role in its execution. In the third phase, the activity is moved entirely into the data…
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    Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

  • China condemns 'cyber terrorism' in wake of Sony attack

    22 Dec 2014 | 2:20 am
    China's foreign minister condemned all forms of "cyber terrorism" in talks with his American counterpart, a statement said Monday, as the US accused Beijing's ally North Korea with being behind a cyber attack on Sony Pictures.
  • BlackBerry rides with Boeing on self-destruct phone

    22 Dec 2014 | 2:10 am
    The news from Reuters on Friday came as no shock to those who know Blackberry's strong rep for security (John Chen, the company's CEO, is not shy about promoting the company's branding message of safety. "Don't be fooled by the competition's rhetoric claiming to be more secure or having more experience than BlackBerry," he has asserted.) The aerospace company Boeing, which communicates with government agencies, decided to build a high-security smartphone of its own based on Android and is now tapping the security tech strengths of Blackberry's BES 12 solution to enhance Boeing's design. On…
  • Madonna speaks of 'crazy times' after songs leaked

    21 Dec 2014 | 11:45 pm
    Madonna and Sony Pictures both were separately torpedoed by major hacks this month, in what the pop icon called "crazy times."
  • Global warming blamed for Pacific coral bleaching

    21 Dec 2014 | 11:44 pm
    The Marshall Islands is experiencing its worst-ever coral bleaching as global warming threatens reefs across the entire northern Pacific, scientists said Monday.
  • Entrepreneur builds a sleek ship, but will anyone buy it?

    21 Dec 2014 | 11:46 am
    Even on land, the Ghost looks futuristic and fast.
 
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    The Fourth Revolution Blog

  • Fourth Revolution takes a break for Christmas…

    Jeremie Averous
    18 Dec 2014 | 3:30 am
    Hi all followers The Fourth Revolution blog is taking a break for Christmas and New Year as I will be travelling through New Zealand’s South Island in a campervan with the family and I can foresee scarce internet connections! Enjoy your year-end festivities..! We will be back early January with new content and thoughts!
  • Where Organization’s Innovations Come From, and How to Foster Them

    Jeremie Averous
    16 Dec 2014 | 3:30 am
    There is a general rule of thumb: “80% of process innovations come from inside companies whereas 80% of product and services innovations come from partners and clients“. The French futurist Denis Ettighoffer underlines: “too often, the utilization of networks by companies remains limited to productivity development rather than the development of creativity processes that are key to the development of value“. I do also observe how much the “not invented here” syndrome, combined with a very low permeability of conventional organization’s borders,…
  • Why Accepting Yourself Will Change the World

    Jeremie Averous
    13 Dec 2014 | 3:30 am
    Building up on our post ‘Why You Need to Accept Yourself First to be Able to Change‘, we can go further and state that being ourselves does not only help ourselves change, but will also change the world. On that, let us quote extensively Carl Rogers from his famous book ‘On Becoming a Person: A Therapist’s View of Psychotherapy‘: “the paradoxical aspect of my experience is that the more I am simply willing to be myself, in all this complexity of life and the more I am willing to understand and accept the realities in myself and in the other person, the…
  • What People Will Remember from You

    Jeremie Averous
    11 Dec 2014 | 3:30 am
    I love that quote: “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel”- Maya Angelou. This is true in all sorts of settings, so let’s review a few areas where it is applicable: When doing public talks or presentations, the real important experience lies at the emotional level. This requires physical comfort, and creating strong emotions in the audience, either through stunning experiences and images, or by referring to people’s own emotional-laden issues. When creating art, paintings, writing a book or…
  • Why ‘Relationship Capital’ Becomes Essential for Organizations

    Jeremie Averous
    9 Dec 2014 | 3:30 am
    “The modern company becomes a relationship organization and thus needs to develop a relationship capital” says the French futurist Denis Ettighoffer, “The methods whereby ideas and related value are created in the Collaborative Economy have nothing to do with the traditional productivity enhancement methods. In the networked organization, the relationship logic replaces departmental and functional logic“. Furthermore, “The continuous expansion of knowledge creates a rupture in the way wealth is apprehended. What creates value is not any more the physical side of…
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    Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra

  • Venus would be lovely

    Glen Hiemstra
    21 Dec 2014 | 3:46 pm
    Floating Ships Above Venus, as envisioned by NASA Langley Personally I’d love to see a mission like this to Venus – why not, before the 21st Century is over? Think big. Think awesome. See a full story of the mission here. The post Venus would be lovely appeared first on Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra.
  • Future Oil Prices Trending Down

    Glen Hiemstra
    8 Dec 2014 | 3:53 pm
    Oil Price Plummets in 2014It was not that long ago, 2008, when oil hit $147 per barrel. At the time, the prospect of oil at $300 did not seem out of the question, though insightful observers quickly pointed out that global economic collapse would prevent oil ever becoming that expensive. And indeed the price of oil peaked there because the global economy did proceed to collapse, though not primarily because oil was that costly. In the years since we have seen the fracking revolution, which has poured new oil into a world of continuing feeble demand. Economic growth has been decoupling from…
  • Did Back to Future Get 2015 Right?

    Glen Hiemstra
    6 Dec 2014 | 7:11 pm
    You might recall that the movie Back to the Future II, made in 1989, involved Doc and Marty time traveling to … 2015. Because of that I’ve been getting lots of calls for interviews on what the film makers got right and wrong about the year 2015. It is fun thing to consider. If you have not seen the movie for a while, or never saw it, check it out. The first 30 minutes especially are a tour de force of sight gags anticipating the world of 2015. Flat screens, video calls, hover boards… check. Flying cars, time machines, fusion flux reactors…not yet. Phone booths and fax…
  • Give Thanks for the Cosmos

    Glen Hiemstra
    26 Nov 2014 | 11:21 am
    Enjoy the Milky Way this Thanksgiving, from the Department of Interior. The post Give Thanks for the Cosmos appeared first on Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra.
  • Clean Tech Energy Cheaper by the Month

    Glen Hiemstra
    25 Nov 2014 | 8:02 am
    The cost of clean tech energy (wind and solar) keeps coming down. It used to be that clean energy had two problems – more costly, and more intermittent. The problem of being intermittent has yet to be overcome – its all about that storage and a smart grid – but wind and solar are on the verge of it being cheaper than coal, oil, gas, says the New York Times. That is a pretty big development. The post Clean Tech Energy Cheaper by the Month appeared first on Futurist.com: Futurist Speaker Glen Hiemstra.
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    XYZ University

  • What would Scrooge do?: Planning for workforce future

    Sarah Sladek
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:35 pm
    ‘Tis the season for the celebration of one year’s end and another year’s beginning. Amidst all the champagne and time spent with family and friends, I encourage you to ponder the future–but perhaps a little differently than usual. Most of us are familiar with the famous story by Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol. In the story, a miser named Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by three ghosts: Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Future. Scrooge finds the third ghost the most fearsome, and the ghost’s warnings about his future transform him from…
  • Culture and the Bottom Line: Why burritos are outperforming the S&P 500

    Sarah Sladek
    8 Dec 2014 | 6:51 am
    You can’t put a price on culture. Or can you? Danny Meyer is a renowned New York City restauranteur and the CEO and founder of Union Square Hospitality Group. He believes success in any business is based on culture. In 2009 Meyer appeared on Jim Cramer’s show Mad Money. On the show, Cramer’s producers surprised him by wheeling out a tray featuring food from various public restaurant companies: a lobster from Red Lobster, a bowl of spaghetti from the Olive Garden, a Big Mac from McDonalds, a steak from Ruth’s Chris Steak House, and a burrito from Chipotle. Cameras are on Meyer and…
  • Want to ace the interview? Strategies for Gen Y job-seekers

    Sarah Sladek
    4 Nov 2014 | 4:40 pm
    Did you know? One of the biggest complaints employers have about Generation Y (1982-1995) is that they’re not prepared for interviews, and many employers consider hiring Gen Ys a risk because they leave their jobs faster than other generations and they are difficult to manage. Prove that you’re a return on investment. Share a past work experience during the interview to help the employer understand how hiring you will bring the company more value than your salary. Bring a business card and samples of your work to the interview. Get a good reference – a knowledgeable expert with many…
  • Scary Stats 2014: 10 Terrifying Workforce Truths

    Sarah Sladek
    31 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Brace yourself. This is scarier than any hairy spider, mean clown costume, or horror flick you could possibly see this Halloween. Last year, XYZ University sent out its Scary Stats debut, and it’s baaack and scarier than ever.  We’re counting the stats down, working our way to the scariest stat of them all. You can run, but you can’t hide!  Scary Stats 2014 10. Four million American Baby Boomers (1946-1964) retired this year. (Social Security Administration) 9.  55% of executives don’t have a process for conducting CEO succession planning (InterSearch…
  • The tech your association needs

    Shannon Neeser
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
    The world is changing, your membership is changing and your association needs to make some changes too. Technology is not something limited to a single department anymore, it’s playing an important role in every member’s life. Tapping into the technology that members use will help you better connect, recruit and retain members. You’ve probably heard this before, but social media and mobile marketing are must-have association tools. These are low-hanging fruit that many associations still need to catch up on. Social media When 89% of 18-29 year olds are using social media, it’s time…
 
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    Singularitarian

  • These Dreamers Are Actually Making Progress Building Elon's Hyperloop

    19 Dec 2014 | 3:24 pm
    These Dreamers Are Actually Making Progress Building Elon's Hyperloop: When Elon Musk unveiled his idea for the Hyperloop in August of 2013, no one seemed sure what the next step would be. The Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO dropped a 57-page alpha white paper on us, noting he didn’t really have the time to build a revolutionary transit system that would shoot pods full of people around the country in above-ground tubes at 800 mph.
  • Amputee Makes History with APL’s Modular Prosthetic Limb

    18 Dec 2014 | 3:31 pm
    Amputee Makes History with APL’s Modular Prosthetic Limb
  • US Navy ‘fully operational’ laser gun blows up...

    11 Dec 2014 | 2:10 pm
    US Navy ‘fully operational’ laser gun blows up boats, drones
  • Project is launched to ensure AI can follow rules and make ethical decisions

    10 Dec 2014 | 9:19 pm
    Project is launched to ensure AI can follow rules and make ethical decisions: Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk are among the eminent scientists who fear that intelligent robots could be mankind’s downfall. And just days after Professor Hawking warned that ‘artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race,’ a team of British researchers are embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous robots we build in the future will make decisions that are ethical and can follow rules.
  • How high-tech, temporary tattoos want to hack your skin

    4 Dec 2014 | 11:51 am
    How high-tech, temporary tattoos want to hack your skin: When you think of temporary tattoos, you probably picture throwaways pieces of paper with cartoon animals on them. Of the damp washcloths pressed over your arm again and again, trying to make them stick. And then the slow fade while the ink peels off. These temporary accessories are full of nostalgia and little else, but a push from technology could make it the latest trend in the wearable market.
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    Thought Infection

  • Summoned – Part 6 of Isaac’s Escape

    @ThoughtInfected
    30 Nov 2014 | 5:15 am
    This is a work in progress for the next part of Isaac’s Escape. Go here for part 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 ——– “He wants to physically meet with me?” Isaac was incredulous. This was the third time he asked the same question. Noah Marks was a notoriously recluse man, and the idea that he should want to have a face-to-biological-face interaction with Isaac was difficult to comprehend. “Yes, a car is already waiting for you” said the BioMark agent as he motioned towards a non-descript black car sitting at the curb in front of them.
  • A Lack of Human Intelligence is Still a Much Larger Threat Than Artificial Intelligence

    @ThoughtInfected
    16 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Elon Musk made headlines recently when, in an interview at the MIT Aerospace Symposium, he stated that he believed that the development of artificial intelligence (AI) is likely the biggest existential threat to humanity; he went as far as to compare the development of AI with the summoning of a demon. Musk is concerned enough about the rapid development of AI systems that he has also put some financial power behind his words, investing in some AI start-ups so he can keep a close eye on progress in the field. While I am reluctant to disagree with the visionary behind three high-tech…
  • Debating the Risk of Change

    @ThoughtInfected
    2 Nov 2014 | 5:10 am
    Why must we endure the frost of January? The question was posed in bold font below a picture of an old woman with her head tucked down into her coat. The wind and snow whipped at her tired looking face and behind her stood a bare and dead looking tree. In the top right of the poster a sticker implored a YES vote on proposition 1155. Across a patio filled with cheap looking outdoor furniture sat two friends with tall glasses of a popular fermented beverage between them. “Shivering in the winter cold, sweating in the summer heat… it’s all so goddamn tiresome. In this day…
  • Real Growth from Virtual Economies – Part III: A Day Inside the Virtual Economy

    @ThoughtInfected
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:21 am
    This is the third part in a series titled Real Growth from Virtual Economies. In the first part, I made the case that the technology and demand is set for a boom in virtual reality within the next half decade. In the second post, I explained how the mass migration of people into virtual space will leads to the natural rise of economies of exchange within these spaces. Coupled with the erosion of physical scarcity due to mass automation in the meat world, I envision that virtualization could lead us into a new type of economy, one which is focused on the service of virtual wants rather than…
  • Real Growth from Virtual Economies – Part II: The Rise of the Virtual Economies

    @ThoughtInfected
    13 Sep 2014 | 11:42 am
    It seems that the idea that that growth in automation and algorithmization could lead to massive joblessness is becoming a popular topic lately. I highly recommend CGPGrey’s recent video on the topic (found here). While I generally agree that this represents a real problem for the near future of real economies, I have also been thinking lately that there may be some merit to one of the retorts that consistently comes up in the discussion; namely, the idea that in the future people will be doing jobs that haven’t yet been invented. Although I am certainly not sure that we will…
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